Color and luminance increment thresholds in poor readers

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Abstract
The hypotheses of a visual basis to reading disabilities in some children have centered around deficits in the visual processes displaying more transient reponses to stimuli although hyperactivity in the visual processes displaying sustained reponses to stimuli has also been proposed as a mechanism. In addition, there is clear evidence that colored lenses and/or colored overlays and/or colored backgrounds can influence performance in reading and/or may assist in providing comfortable vision for reading and, as a consequence, the ability to maintain reading for longer. As a consequence, it is surprising that the color vision of poor readers is relatively little studied. We assessed luminance increment thresholds and equi-luminous red-green and blue-yellow increment thresholds using a computer based test in central vision and at 10 degrees nasally employing the paradigm pioneered by King-Smith. We examined 35 poor readers (based on the Neale Analysis of Reading) and compared their performance with 35 normal readers...
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Dain, Stephen
Floyd, Richard
Elliott, Robert
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Publication Year
2008
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Journal Article
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