Learning from the Past: young Indigenous people’s accounts of blood-borne viral and sexually transmitted infections in Australia

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Abstract
The Indigenous Resilience Project is an Australian community-based participatory research project using qualitative methods to explore young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s views of blood borne viral and sexually transmitted infections (BBV/STI) affecting their communities. In this paper we present an analysis of narratives from young people who had a previous BBV/STI diagnosis to explore how they actively negotiate the experience of BBV/STI infection to construct a classic resilience narrative. We examine two overarching themes: first, the context of infection and diagnosis, including ignorance of STI/BBV prior to infection/diagnosis; and second, turning points and transformation in the form of insights, behaviours, roles and agency. Responding to critical writing on resilience theory, we argue that providing situated accounts of adversity from the perspectives of young Indigenous people prioritises their subjective understandings and challenges normative definitions of resilience.
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Author(s)
Mooney-Somers, Julie
Olsen, Anna
Erick, Wani
Scott, Robert
Akee, Angie
Kaldor, John
Maher, Lisa
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Publication Year
2010
Resource Type
Journal Article
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UNSW Faculty
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download Peer reviewed accepted version.pdf 200.62 KB Adobe Portable Document Format
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