Prisons, hepatitis c and harm minimisation

Access & Terms of Use
metadata only access
Abstract
Australian prisons have been identified as a focus of the ongoing hepatitis C epidemic. Harm minimisation is the major strategy directed to community-based public health measures to control hepatitis C. Harm-minimisation strategies to protect inmates and workers are incompletely and inconsistently applied in Australian prisons. Overseas experience has demonstrated that introducing injecting-equipment exchange programs and professional tattoo parlours in prisons could at least partially reduce the risks of ongoing hepatitis C transmission, and would support prevention and treatment programs. A two-stage approach is suggested: firstly, implementing programs of proven effectiveness consistently across the eight Australian jurisdictions, and, secondly, expanding current initiatives in the light of international ¿best practice¿.
Persistent link to this record
DOI
Link to Publisher Version
Additional Link
Author(s)
Levy, Michael
Treloar, Carla
Booker, Norman
McDonald, Rodney
Supervisor(s)
Creator(s)
Editor(s)
Translator(s)
Curator(s)
Designer(s)
Arranger(s)
Composer(s)
Recordist(s)
Conference Proceedings Editor(s)
Other Contributor(s)
Corporate/Industry Contributor(s)
Publication Year
2007
Resource Type
Journal Article
Degree Type