Barriers to the use of anticoagulation for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation - A representative survey of Australian family physicians

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Abstract
Background and Purpose: Anticoagulation reduces the risk of stroke in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation yet remains underused. We explored barriers to the use of anticoagulants among Australian family physicians. Methods: The authors conducted a representative, national survey. Results: Of the 596 (64.4%) eligible family physicians who participated, 15.8% reported having a patient with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation experience an intracranial hemorrhage with anticoagulation and 45.8% had a patient with known nonvalvular atrial fibrillation experience a stroke without anticoagulation. When presented with a patient at `very high risk` of stroke, only 45.6% of family physicians selected warfarin in the presence of a minor falls risk and 17.1% would anticoagulate if the patient had a treated peptic ulcer. Family physicians with less decisional conflict and longer-standing practices were more likely to endorse anticoagulation. Conclusion: Strategies to optimize the management of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation should address psychological barriers to using anticoagulation.
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Author(s)
Gattellari, Melina
Worthington, John
Zwar, N
Middleton, Susan
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Publication Year
2008
Resource Type
Journal Article
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UNSW Faculty