Teaching translators throughself-directed learning: Documenting the implementation of and perceptions about self-directed learning in a translation course

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Abstract
This article discusses the rationale, design, process and findings of a research project on the implementation of selfdirected learning (SDL) in the teaching of translation and on the perceptions of the pedagogy as experienced by the sampled selfdirected learners. In contrast to pedagogies that treat learners as identical and teach them the same repertoire of knowledge and skills, SDL sees learners as unique and different from one another and aspires to enable each of them to learn what he or she needs to learn and in a manner and pace suitable to him or her. While it is not uncommon in many other disciplines of teaching, the pedagogy is rarely heard of in the teaching of translation and interpreting, which as a discipline tends to stress authority, conformity and commonality. The project reported on here engaged four students for continuous observation, documented their participation in SDL, studied their perceptions about SDL and also investigated whether SDL could facilitate individualized learning of translation. It also examined possible correlations between the personal profiles of the four learners and their achievements through selfdirected learning.
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Zhong, Yong
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Publication Year
2008
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Journal Article
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