A trial of a community-based intervention to support the active engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in parenting, and to improve men’s feelings of empowerment, reduce mental distress and reduce drug and alcohol use.

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Copyright: Reilly, Lyndon
Abstract
The intervention ‘A trial of a community-based intervention to support the active engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men in parenting, and to improve men’s feelings of empowerment, reduce mental distress and reduce drug and alcohol use’ aimed to increase knowledge of men’s roles as parents, increase feelings of empowerment, decrease mental distress and family conflict, and reduce the use of alcohol or drugs. The study followed the guidelines published by Campbell et al. (2000) on conducting and evaluating complex community-based interventions. In early 2017, the trial started in the Lower Gulf of Carpentaria Aboriginal community of Doomadgee in the Men’s Shed. The findings are based on a Qualitative Description (QD) of measures. The sample size for the control group was substantially smaller than anticipated, and the reasons for withdrawal or drop out are described in the thesis. Given the small sample, it was not empirically sound to compare changes pre and post intervention with pre and post control, even descriptively. The insight and knowledge gathered from this study offers great learning and evidence for the field and the communities that support, or might in the future support, men’s groups, and men’s parenting. As such, the study assumed only small numbers of participants, given the time required and the low level of funding available to the candidate. The intervention aimed, however, to meet the criteria of an exploratory trial, apply a pragmatic community-based design, and ensure feasibility, cultural acceptability, and the potential to sustain the initiative. Finally, the intervention offered to set the stage for future definitive randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the field.
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Publication Year
2021
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Thesis
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PhD Doctorate
UNSW Faculty
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