Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 36
  • (2010) Lee, Evelyn; Holt, Martin; Zablotska, Iryna; Prestage, Garrett; McKenzie, Tex; Batrouney, Colin; Kennedy, Mike; Dixon, Matt; de Wit, John
    Report
    The Melbourne Gay Community Periodic Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited at a range of gay community sites in Melbourne. The project was funded by the Victorian Department of Health and supported by the Victorian AIDS Council and PLWHA Victoria. The major aim of the survey was to provide data on sexual, drug use and testing practices related to the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmissible infections (STIs) among men involved in Melbourne’s gay community.

  • (2010) Holt, Martin; Zablotska, Iryna; Lee, Evelyn; Ryan, Dermot; Down, Ian; Heard, Todd; Nairn, Karen; Prestage, Garrett; de Wit, John
    Report
    The Town and Country Gay Community Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited from Sydney and regional New South Wales. 1371 men were recruited for the Sydney Gay Community Periodic Survey in August 2009 and 469 men were recruited between August and November 2009 from regional New South Wales. This report compares these two groups of men (from the city and regional areas) on a range of indicators.

  • (2010) Wilson, Hannah; Hopwood, Max; Lavis, Yvonna; Newland, Jamee; Bryant, Joanne; Treloar, Carla
    Report
    Available literature indicates that clinical factors, social factors, personal values and knowledge are all important in determining whether or not people decide to have treatment for hepatitis C. Therefore this study sought to investigate a range of factors associated with making the decision to take up treatment. Additionally, to explore how Australian clients of Opiate Substitute Treatment (OST) centres made decisions about treatment, this study interviewed a sample of OST clients and health professionals in Sydney about their perceptions of a proposed model of delivery of treatment for hepatitis C through OST clinics.

  • (2010) Deacon, Rachel; Newland, Jamee; Harris, Magdalena; Treloar, Carla; Maher, Lisa
    Report
    In NSW, hepatitis C has been the subject of specific surveillance and prevention programs for many years. Despite this experience and significant investment, there remain challenges both in understanding the epidemiology of this virus and in implementing effective prevention programs. This study aimed to enhance the public health surveillance program and contribute to the evidence base for hepatitis C prevention in NSW. The aim of Phase One was to develop and trial a methodology for an ongoing program of enhanced surveillance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in NSW. Phase Two aimed to increase understanding of the practices, settings, networks and structures contributing to HCV infection.

  • (2010) Newman, Christy; Limin, Mao; Kippax, Susan
    Journal Article
    The Primary Health Care Project on HIV and Depression is a study that was conducted over three years to look at issues surrounding HIV and depression in Gay men. The study investigated the prevalence, nature, clinical management and self-management of depression among men, particularly homosexually active men, attending high HIV-caseload general practice clinics in Sydney, Adelaide and a rural-coastal town in New South Wales. The study had three broad aims. The first was to describe, measure and compare depression among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay men. The second was to describe the ways in which depression is managed by general practitioners (GPs) and gay men themselves; and the third was to develop the research capacity and skills of GPs to assess and manage depression among gay men.

  • (2010) Treloar, Carla; Byron, Paul; Mccann, Pol; Maher, Lisa
    Journal Article
    Several candidate vaccines for hepatitis C are currently in preclinical development or the early stages of clinical trials. Implementing trials of these vaccines among people who inject drugs will be challenging. Previous research, particularly willingness to participate studies in relation to HIV vaccines in marginalised groups, has focused on the modifiable characteristics of individual participants. This qualitative research with people who inject drugs, health staff and clinicians focuses on social, organisational and structural elements of vaccine trial designs which may exclude or reduce the participation of people who inject drugs.

  • (2010) Wilson, Hannah; Bryant, Joanne; Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla
    Journal Article
    There is evidence to suggest that illicit drug use is increasingly a ‘normal’ part of the lives of many young people in Australia. The normalisation framework has been applied in limited contexts in Australia, and has not been assessed using longitudinal data. This paper uses cross-sectional periodic data collected at the Sydney Big Day Out music festival between 2006 and 2009 to examine several aspects of normalisation among festival patrons. Over the 4-year period high proportions of respondents reported that cannabis and ecstasy were ‘very easy’ or ‘fairly easy’ to obtain. In most years, over half the respondents reported ‘any illicit drug use’ in the past 12 months. A statistically significant relationship was found between recent illicit drug use and degree of contact with other people who use drugs (χ2 = 64.391, df = 4, p = 0.001). Such results suggest that certain aspects of drug use are normalised among festival patrons and that these are particularly concentrated among certain groups of young people. These groups could to be targeted when delivering drug education and prevention activities.

  • (2010) Newman, Christy; Kippax, Susan; Mao, Limin; Deborah, Saltman; Kidd, Michael
    Journal Article
    Background This article identifies the roles that gay men with depression ascribe to their chosen general practitioner and considers how they might influence the dynamics of clinical interactions between gay men and their doctors. Methods Forty gay identified men with depression (recruited from high HIV caseload general practices in New South Wales and South Australia) took part in semistructured interviews that were analysed using the principles of thematic analysis. Seventeen men (aged 20–73 years) were HIV positive. Results Five distinct roles were identified: GP as trusted confidant, gentle guide, provider of services, effective conduit, and community peer. Discussion Gay men who have ongoing contact with their GP may expect them to intuitively understand which roles are expected and appropriate to perform in each consultation and over time. General practitioners should consider these changing roles, and take them into account (as appropriate) to achieve open and trusting relationships in the care of their gay male patients.

  • (2010) Kelly, Angela; Worth, Heather; Man, N.; Nosi, S.; Emori, R.; Mek, A.; Akuani, F.; Kupul, M.; Kepa, B.; Walizopa, L.; Pirpir, L.; Cangah , B.; Siba , P.; Frankland, Andrew; Rawstorne, Patrick
    Journal Article
    Papua New Guinea (PNG) is in a phase of scaling up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and adherence to the newly available drug therapy is becoming an important issue. This paper examines adherence to ART in a sample of 374 HIV-positive people in six provinces in PNG. Participants were recruited to the study using non-probability sampling. Sixty-two % of participants reported complete adherence (no missed or late doses in the past week) and 79% reported not missing any doses in the last week. Revival church members were significantly more likely to report having missing a treatment dose(s) (66%). Those living in the Highlands and those attending Catholic health clinics were significantly more likely to be adherent to their treatment. Age, gender, marital status, education level and employment type did not show significant association with treatment adherence. Adherence rates in PNG are not alarming, indicating that people with HIV can adhere to treatment despite the challenges of living in PNG.

  • (2010) Brener, Loren; Von Hippel, William; Kippax, Susan; Preacher, Kristopher
    Journal Article
    In 2005, 60 health care workers were recruited through services that attract injecting drug users (IDUs) and asked to complete attitude measures regarding IDU clients. Mediation analyses indicated that conservative health care workers displayed more negative attitudes toward their IDU clients because they believe that injecting drug use is within the control of the IDU. Negative attitudes toward IDU clients, in turn, were associated with worry about IDU clients' behavior in the clinic and with beliefs that IDU clients should disclose their hepatitis C status to their health care worker. Perceptions of controllability of drug use were also associated with the belief that IDU clients' ailments were caused by their IDU status. The study's limitations are noted.