Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 43

  • (2004) Smith, Gary Paul
    Thesis

  • (2004) Race, Kane
    Thesis
    Pleasure Consuming Medicine investigates the significance of the classification of drugs for conceptions of personhood in the context of consumer citizenship. It examines how drug discourses operate politically to sustain particular notions of personhood and organise bodies. As the normative conception of social life shifts to a discourse of consumer agency and active citizenship, it is argued, drugs come to describe the moral boundaries of a freedom configured around personal consumption. The thesis tracks the parallel rise of two discourses of drug mis/use from the 1970s - a discourse of 'drug abuse' and a discourse of 'patient compliance' - illustrating how these discourses bind personal agency to medical authority through a vocabulary of self-administration. It describes how illicit drugs are constructed as a sign and instance of excessive conformity to consumer culture, and how this excess is opportunistically scooped off and spectacularised to stage an intense but superficial battle between the amoral market and the moral state. Pleasure Consuming Medicine uses a theoretical frame developed from queer theory, corporeal feminism, governmentality studies and cultural studies to explore the political character of drug regimes, tracing some of the ramifications for sex, race, class, and citizenship. Then it turns to the field of gay men's HIV education to conceive some alternative and provisional vocabularies of safety. The thesis develops an argument on the exercise of power in consumer society, with the aim of contributing to cultural and critical understandings of consumption, embodiment, sex, health, and citizenship.

  • (2019) Tumwine, Christopher
    Thesis
    Socio-ecological factors such as poverty and mobility have been linked to HIV transmission in East African fishing communities. Little however is known about the influence of these factors on access to and use of HIV testing, treatment and care. To address this gap, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 HIV positive fisherfolk and 15 health care providers from two HIV clinics located in two fishing communities in Uganda to identify socio-ecological factors influencing access to and use of HIV testing, treatment and care. Bronfenbrenner’s (1979) ecological systems theory guided the analysis of the above interviews. Informational, instrumental, affiliative and emotional support emerging from micro and mesosystem contexts facilitated access to and use of HIV testing, treatment and care. However, HIV-related discrimination present in these same contexts left some participants less supported in accessing services. Exosystem factors, including partner notification initiatives, facilitated some participants’ access to HIV testing, while occasional disruptions in supplies to clinics constrained the availability of HIV-related care. Macrosystem cultural factors, such as beliefs in traditional healing systems, delayed some fisherfolk’s access to HIV testing, while factors linked to the economic context in fishing communities including fisherfolk’s geographic mobility and poor transport systems regularly constrained access to treatment and care. Despite these difficulties, health service organisational factors were to a large extent successful in facilitating fisherfolk’s access to HIV testing, treatment and care. The effects of enabling and constraining factors and processes operating at each of these levels are identified in the thesis which also includes a diachronic analysis – using selected case studies – of the manner in which individual health and illness trajectories are impacted upon by different combinations of factors over time. Overall, the thesis contributes to a more nuanced, socially located understanding of factors influencing access to and use of HIV testing, treatment and care in fishing communities in Uganda. It highlights the need for programmes and interventions to engage more seriously with structural and contextual factors influencing fisherfolk access to services and support.

  • (2017) Hasan, Md Kamrul
    Thesis
    Together, men, masculinities and health comprise an emerging area of research, activism and policy debate. International research on men’s health demonstrates how men’s enactment of masculinity may be linked to their sexual health risk. However, little research to date has explored men’s enactment of different forms of masculinity and men’s sexual health from a social generational perspective. To address this gap, insights from Mannheim’s work on social generations, Connell’s theory of masculinity, Butler’s theory of gender performativity, and Alldred and Fox’s work on the sexuality-assemblage, were utilised to offer a better understanding of the implications of masculinities for men’s sexual health. A multi-site cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted in three cities in Bangladesh. Semi-structured interviews were used to capture narratives from 34 men representing three contrasting social generations: an older social generation (growing up pre-1971), a middle social generation (growing up in the 1980s and 1990s), and a younger social generation (growing up post-2010). A thematic approach was applied to analysis to identify the key issues focused upon in men’s accounts. The analysis revealed generational differences and similarities in the construction of masculinity, in sexual practices and in help and health-seeking practices. Findings show that certain ideals of masculinity were common across all social generations. However, social, cultural, economic and political transformations in Bangladesh have produced significant cross-generational differences and discontinuities. Study findings point to the importance of understanding how the production and enactment of specific forms of masculinity are shaped by education, urbanisation, and globalisation, as well as by the cultural dynamics of religion (especially Islam), work, homosociality, patriarchy and heteronormativity, and how these in turn affect sexual health and health-seeking practices. This thesis contributes to a socially located understanding of masculinities, gender and men’s sexual health from a social generational perspective. It argues for the need to move beyond stereotypical, reductionist, essentialist and binary understandings of men, masculinity, gender and health in the South Asian contexts, highlighting opportunities for new forms of intervention and action to promote men’s sexual health.

  • (2020) Addo, Isaac
    Thesis
    A significant amount of research suggests that excess weight gain can increase the risk of developing some non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In 2014, a screening project organised by the Western Melbourne Regional Development Australia noted that 68% of Australian residents of African ancestry were overweight, obese or morbidly obese, which was higher than the national average of 61.3%. Previous studies indicate that post-migration changes in dietary and physical activity behaviours may contribute to these weight-related issues. However, there is a dearth of research examining the factors associated with dietary and physical activity behaviours among Australian residents born in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Given the adverse health implications associated with excess weight again, it is important to investigate the dietary and physical activity behaviours of Australian residents born in SSA, to inform appropriate health promotion policies and interventions. This study examined factors associated with post-migration dietary and physical activity behaviours among Australian residents born in SSA. The study employed a mixed-method approach, comprising in-depth qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys. Using the Australian states of New South Wales and Victoria as the study setting, a quota sampling strategy was used to recruit 24 participants for the in-depth interviews, and a total of 253 respondents were recruited for the survey. Overall, the findings indicate significant changes in dietary and physical activity behaviours after participants settled in Australia. To a large extent, the post-migration changes in dietary and physical activity behaviours reflect less healthy behaviours and can put participants at serious risk of weight-related NCDs. Multiple interrelated factors, comprising acculturation, socio-demographic factors (e.g. age, duration of residence in Australia, rural or urban residency before immigration, and unemployment), environmental factors (e.g. availability and affordability of traditional African food and physical activity products), cultural factors (e.g. cultural beliefs about body sizes), and social-cognitive factors (e.g. attitudes and behavioural intention), were significantly associated with the reported changes in behaviours. It is, therefore, important to develop nuanced health promotion interventions to address the factors associated with the less healthy dietary and physical activity behaviours reported among this under-researched population.

  • (2021) Prankumar, Sujith
    Thesis
    Drawing on Karen Barad’s agential realism and the lens of citizenship, this thesis explores the lived experiences and attitudes of Lebanese, Indian and Anglo LGBTQ+ young adults living in Sydney, Australia. Data collection and analysis were based on qualitative in-depth narrative interviews (n=42) and optional follow-up photo-elicitation interviews (n=20). Participants’ responses, analysed abductively, were framed along broader themes of moral, cultural and sexual citizenship, each further contextualised using aspects of Barad’s theorising: diffraction, time and agency. The thesis has three main findings. First, ‘Australianness’ was predicated on a form of Whiteness that is linked to colonial history and disenfranchisement of First Nations peoples, with consequences for social participation, inclusion within LGBTQ+ communities, and sexual citizenship. Second, heteropatriarchal community values, material culture, religion and spatiotemporal geographies were found to be key factors that influenced young adults’ connection with their cultural communities. Third, the attainment of – or limits to – sexual citizenship and participation was found to be a collaborative endeavour created by an entanglement of formal and informal policies, everyday experiences and material factors. While intersections along the lines of ethnicity, gender, financial ability, locality, disability and so on influenced participants’ participation in domains of everyday life, employing a Baradian framework revealed that young people were far from passive subjects in their social environments and often found ways to explore various aspects of citizenship through an ever-evolving entanglement of agencies. The thesis concludes by arguing that key to the realisation of more just and promising futures and more embracing notions of youth citizenship is the attention paid to relations between belonging, hope and flourishing, which shape, and are shaped by, valences of moral, cultural and sexual citizenship.

  • (2021) Gardner, Kristy
    Thesis
    This study takes a deliberate strengths-based approach to identify the sources of sexual health information accessed by Aboriginal young people from one community in Western Sydney, and the role of technology in their information seeking. The research design draws on Aboriginal Ways of Knowing, Being and Doing (Martin & Mirraboopa, 2003) to position Aboriginal young people’s knowledge and experiences as central to the research as participants, peer interviewers and ultimately peer researchers. The research methods were qualitative; peer-led interviews with 23 Aboriginal young people in Western Sydney were conducted. Peer interviewers were selected in consultation with members of a local Aboriginal community. Three male and five female interviewers were selected to ensure that cultural expectations were met regarding the need to discuss issues around sexual health with a person of the same gender. The findings showed that participants used the internet to access information about physical symptoms because searching for information online allowed privacy. Participants then approached trusted sources, including those with whom they had formal relationships (doctors, teachers, counsellors) and informal relationships (family members, friends), to check that the information participants found online was correct and trustworthy. In this context young people used the internet as a triaging tool. The participants were also aware that their formal sources of help and advice, such as teachers, might have to undertake mandatory reporting if certain subject matter were discussed, although the parameters around this obligation and their understanding of which particular professionals were required to do so were not always clear. The research findings therefore have important implications for how sexual health education programs for Aboriginal young people living in urban areas should be targeted.

  • (2008) Mackie, Brent Donalson
    Thesis
    This project critically examines the question Are HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns more effective at engaging gay men if they use colloquial language and sexually explicit imagery? by investigating the impact of sexually explicit campaigns on the Sydney gay community. The project approaches the question in three parts: 1. A review of literature exploring the circumstances in which and for what reasons sexually explicit HIV/AIDS campaigns are produced. 2. An analysis of seven interviews with producers of HIV prevention campaigns exploring how, why, where and for what reasons explicit campaigns are produced. 3. An analysis of eight interviews with homosexually active Sydney men exploring how HIV prevention campaigns are viewed, consumed and understood. The interviews were in-depth, semi-structured and conducted over one hour per interviewee. The findings are dominated by two interrelated and at times conflicting themes. First, that there is a strongly held belief by campaign producers that the most effective HIV prevention campaigns targeting gay men are produced by the community and reflect that community and as a result must at times be sexually explicit. Second, that it is no longer sufficient for HIV prevention campaigns to rely on explicit sex to attract attention. In an environment where visual images, and sexually explicit visual images especially, are becoming more accessible, and media and communication is more prevalent and complex, safe sex campaigns are forced to deliver ever more sophisticated and stimulating creative materials in order to maintain the engagement of gay men. The interviews revealed that both campaign producers and consumers participated in the production of a visual literacy of safe sex campaigns. This literacy was necessary to both effectively produce and comprehend the campaigns. The interviews showed that while HIV prevention campaigns that use sexually explicit language and imagery can be highly effective at engaging gay men, the success of sexually explicit campaigns is contextual that is, dependent on where, to whom and in what circumstances the materials are delivered. The audience’s accumulation of knowledge and cultural experience when viewing the campaigns, in other words their safe sex campaign literacy, significantly influenced their capacity to understand, appreciate and be engaged with sexually explicit HIV prevention campaigns.

  • (2008) Mouton, Marlize
    Thesis
    Hepatitis C is a fast growing infectious disease in Australia and is often associated with related psycho-social and mental health problems. The conventional treatment process for hepatitis C is challenging due to a number of reasons. This study explored social workers’ perceptions of the contribution of their role in hepatitis C treatment centres in relation to the treatment experience of patients. The roles that social workers fulfill, their contribution to the multidisciplinary team and towards a culturally competent service, were explored. Furthermore the knowledge, skills and values required for providing a competent service in a hepatitis C treatment setting was explored. The broad theoretical frameworks that inform social work practice were considered, especially the biopsycho-social model, the strengths perspective, the critically reflexive approach and communications theory. This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview method for data collection. Ten social workers in hepatitis C treatment clinics participated in the study. The findings highlight the needs of patients and how social worker participants described helping to address and meet these needs by employing their knowledge, skills and values through their social work roles and interventions in a team context in a multicultural and multi-faceted work environment. A major challenge that social workers described was to keep patients on treatment despite debilitating side effects that diminish patients' motivation to complete treatment. A shortcoming in the service was described to be the limited psychiatric support available at many treatment centres. The findings lead to a number of recommendations to improve social work services in hepatitis C treatment settings. More research was recommended in areas such as motivational techniques, psychiatric support, and effective group work strategies. The need for increased funding for social work positions in the hepatitis C field was also highlighted. It is anticipated that findings of this study can be applied to hepatitis C treatment in broader settings such as prisons, drug and alcohol settings and general practice. This research will contribute to literature in the field of hepatitis C treatment models and in the field of social work practice in hepatitis C contexts.