Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 30
  • (2020) Harper, Mitchell
    Thesis
    This thesis investigates Deleuze’s genetic account of real experience in Difference and Repetition (hereafter DR) as a systematic form of metaphysics. While there is broad agreement on the aims of DR as a thesis in metaphysics, there is significant disparity in accounts of how this is accomplished. The overall goal of this thesis is to examine and clarify the processes involved in Deleuze’s metaphysical account of genesis in DR (the three syntheses of time and space, differentiation, individuation, differenciation, and dramatisation), how these processes involve a metaphysics of difference (intensive quantity), how they form a system (the relationship between the virtual, the actual, and the intensive), and how this has been understood in the secondary scholarship. Chapter 1 examines Deleuze’s reading of Kantian critique for two reasons. Firstly, it outlines Kant’s account of the conditioning of possible experience in order to provide a framework from which to understand how Deleuze radically transforms transcendental philosophy. Secondly, it critically examines Deleuze’s reading of Kant’s genetic account of real experience in order to outline its philosophical limitations. Chapter 2 explores Deleuze’s reconstructive reading of Nietzsche’s metaphysics of becoming as a rewrite of Kantian critique in order to show, on the one hand, that a metaphysical account of transcendental genesis necessitates a theory of time that attempts to grasp the perpetual emergence of the absolutely new, and on the other, that it provides a preliminary sketch of Deleuze’s own metaphysical system in DR. Chapter 3 aims to illuminate the three syntheses of time in Chapter 2 of DR by examining both how they form an interdependent unity and how they have been interpreted in the secondary scholarship. Chapter 4 analyses the secondary scholarship on DR and puts forward a novel interpretation of Deleuze’s metaphysics by arguing, on the one hand, that individuation signifies a process of intensive quantity split between differentiation (the virtual) and differenciation (the actual), such that, intensities comprise both the virtual and the actual, and on the other, that this entails a metaphysical (or panpsychist) conception of thought that involves a parallelism between Ideas and sensibility.

  • (2021) Miller, Gretchen
    Thesis
    What is the experience of being a rescuer of damaged landscapes and broken creatures, at a time of environmental crisis in Australia? How do individuals and grassroots communities go about small acts of rescue, and how do they maintain the courage to do this work? The Rescue Project is practice-based research. It includes a public digital storytelling site of 51 text-based rescuer story contributions, alongside a podcast of four episodes, plus an exegesis providing critical reflection and analysis of the creative practice and the resultant thematic threads. The digital site was constructed in partnership with the non-government, volunteer-based, land regeneration organisation Landcare Australia. This practice and exegesis contribute new thinking to the scholarship of environmental communication by considering the meaning of rescue, providing insights into the affectual themes of acts of rescue, articulating rescue relations, and introducing and developing several key terms: ecosonics, homeground, and citizen storytelling. The themes which emerge from this project reveal the emotional affects and effects of undertaking rescues, and suggest rescues take place within three related and iterative overarching themes. Firstly, the theme of humility that is required to begin an act of rescue. Secondly, the theme of attunement that builds resonances with both sentient figures and non-sentient features of homegrounds. Finally, the theme of courage to undertake rescue activities, and courage’s iterative outcome, encouragement. Further, this practice and exegesis contribute to environmental communication through foregrounding listening and hearing, the spoken word, community storytelling, and the ecosonics of the more-than-human world. In giving space to the methodological processes of my creative practice, this exegesis offers environmental communication practitioners new ways to go about their work. It also responds to current calls within this scholarship for a listening modality: for too long we have been deaf to the sounds of the more-than-human world. The Rescue Project is a demonstration of how we might humbly hear these worlds speak. To explore the digital space, please visit: https://web.archive.org/web/20210530042604/https://landcareaustralia.org.au/rescue/

  • (2020) Buckle, Caitlin
    Thesis
    Understanding migrants' lived experiences are integral to explorations of lifestyle migration. Examining mobility experiences over the entire life course enables insight into decision-making processes, how lifestyle migration may link to childhood experiences, as well as to life stage and tourism-related mobilities. Capturing the rich detail of migration(s) as lived experience, thus requires specialised research design that not only charts migration trajectories, but also synthesises the various components of migrants' mobile lives over their life course. The papers presented as part of this thesis draw from an innovative research design. Participants recalled their lived experiences over their life course using narratives, visual imagery and virtual visitation. One part of the method drew from in-depth biographical interview data with international and domestic migrants to Maroochy in Queensland, Australia. During the interviews, each participant narrated their residential moves over their life course. Our experiential journeys navigated multiple homes and places, lived and left as a migration biography. In positioning the places lived and left as important to the most recent migration decisions to move to Maroochy, I also reflected on my own migration biography - from Maroochy - and the influence of my situated knowledge. The visual and virtual components of the research method provided a platform to advance the use of geospatial technologies in presenting migrants' experiences. Using Google Earth satellite imagery, participants' migration narratives proceeded alongside their visitation of past residences, and their accompanying place-based stories. I recorded this synchronous combination of oral narrative with visual journey using audio and screen-capture software, and created mapped migration biographies combining the transcribed narratives and satellite imagery. I discuss the difficulties and opportunities for using geospatial technologies to represent migrants' experiences. Digital mapping added visual, multiscalar, tactile and mobile aspects to the migration narratives, providing opportunity for virtual visitation of past migrations. The participants interacted with the interface as a 'digital body', (re)performing their lived experiences of migration. A key thesis finding relates to how the method extended the capacities of oral and textual analysis to incorporate the visual features and spatialities of my participants' mobile lives.

  • (2021) Vitale, Luke
    Thesis
    This thesis presents a new history of Italian immigration to Australia that roughly covers the period between the Intercolonial Conference on the Chinese Question held in 1888 and the beginning of World War II in 1940. It argues that the presence of Italian migrants in Australia, as workers and settlers, was tied to White Australia’s three main agendas: creating a racially homogenous white population, securing British/Australian possession of the continent, and developing a modern industrial capitalist economy. While contributing positively towards the achievement of these goals, their presence also represented a contradiction for White Australia. As a result, despite being acceptable and sometimes even desirable within the co-ordinates of White Australia, their presence was contested and always needed to be re-affirmed by supporters of Italian immigration and by Italians themselves. From these contestations over Italians’ desirability in White Australia, emerged a number of constructions such as pioneer, settler, citizen and defender that highlighted certain characteristics such as race, class, labour practices and respectability. Through an analysis of newspaper articles in both English and Italian, the parliamentary Hansard and a variety of government archives, this thesis examines how these constructions emerged out of the political and class conflicts of White Australia. It also examines the role Italians played in the creation and propagation of these constructions and how this was informed by their own ideas about race and labour that were influenced by a variety of political ideologies and class positions that divided the body of Italian migrants in Australia during this period.

  • (2022) Ayshan, Han
    Thesis
    Video game trailers are an effective promotional form of intermediation that enables audiences to navigate and engage with old and new media. Although video game trailers function as advertisements designed to sell a game, they are also stories that provoke social media commentary and debate. Trailers aim to draw the viewer in, convey sound and imagery, and evoke an involuntary reaction of excitement and awe. In this thesis, I will be using the games Fallout 4, Watch Dogs 2, and Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate. In the case studies, I investigate how viewers make sense of the promotional and storytelling aspects of video game trailers. I examine how video game trailers have the potential to arouse emotions and interest before viewers even play the game. Trailers provide an insight into the basic gameplay, not only into the gameplay but also into the story and the characters (protagonists and antagonists). They show audiences the video game theme genre and provide the viewer with a visual and auditory tool to entice possession. This project explores these themes, showing how video game trailers have an inherited cinematic quality but also how trailers actually spend little time presenting actual gameplay. There is a clear connection with movie trailers, teasing the events that will take place in the game and asking the player what will happen next. In this study, I used the methods of narrative analysis and textual analysis to analyse comments from YouTube, Facebook, and a survey of video gamers. The textual analysis of the trailers raises questions of representation and authenticity. In this research, I identified an incongruity between the representation of the core features of a game and the promotion of those features in the trailer. The narrative analysis of the trailers focused on storytelling and emplotment in the trailers. A key theme that has emerged from the analysis is that superheroes engage in vigilantism, a justifiable form of self-administered violence. Gamers may feel at ease with the violence used to correct perceived injustices. There is potential for gamers to consider the moral grey area of vigilante violence and romanticised vigilantism. With their enhanced ability to simulate complex interactive narratives for actual and simulated authenticity, video games offer a sophisticated engagement with players that contributes significantly to their widespread and universal support. The role of culturally created characters in the experience of playing a video game helps stimulate philosophical research. I explore whether normative audience expectations can speed up the development of cultural expectations about the relationship between the player and the narrative of the game and its audience. In this context, I examine case study video game trailers and ask what it means to revise our understanding of the relationship between power, law, and morality while playing the game. I examine and critique how the narrative, and thus the mechanics of a specific game, shapes our understanding of connection, power, law, or morality; I contend that prestige reflects normative privilege and law.

  • (2022) Jung, Sin Ji
    Thesis
    Sparked by the interesting observation of non-native acquisition of heritage languages despite early and continuous exposure, the study of heritage languages has endeavoured to explore the end results of heritage language acquisition while mostly neglecting the pathway that heritage speakers undergo before arriving in that state. This study investigated how the heritage language develops and is maintained over primary school years in heritage speakers of Korean who grow up in Australia. Linguistic abilities in Korean of 243 heritage speakers of Korean of primary school age in Australia, compared to their school-year-level-matched native speakers of Korean in the Republic of Korean (South Korea), have been examined in the three broad linguistic areas of the sound system, lexis and grammar with a battery of tasks. The results of the tasks indicated that the heritage speakers generally fell behind the native speakers in the linguistic abilities in Korean examined but their gap to the native speaker controls differed between the linguistic areas examined. Regarding the sound system, the heritage speakers did not show reliably lower perception of speech sounds in Korean than those of the native speakers, and their speech sound perception, which is supposed to have developed and been stabilised in early childhood, appeared to be retained well over primary school years. On the contrary, they exhibited a great shortfall in lexical knowledge in Korean compared to their native speaker peers, and this gap appeared to widen from the middle primary school year levels where the lexical knowledge of the native speakers expands explosively. In comparison, their linguistic abilities in grammar exhibited a varying degree of divergence to the native speaker norms by linguistic aspect. The results suggested that they acquired basic syntactic structures and semantic features that develop early in first language acquisition of Korean to a level comparable to that of their native speaker peers and their understanding of sentences made of such linguistic aspects was maintained well over the primary school period. In contrast, they exhibited a considerable delay in the acquisition of certain grammatical aspects that are mastered relatively late by the native speakers, and the heritage speakers’ acquisition of these aspects did not seem to progress greatly over primary school years. They also showed a substantial gap to the native speaker controls in understanding passive sentences and scrambled active sentences, and this gap is likely to have arisen from their greater processing difficulty. Mostly paralleling the linguistic abilities of adult heritage speakers attested in previous research, the results of this study underline that the linguistic abilities in Korean of heritage speakers of Korean in Australia diverge from their (age- or) school-year-level-appropriate native norms already in their primary school years. Although the linguistic aspects that are mastered early in first language acquisition such as phoneme distinction or basic syntactic structures seem to be acquired to a level comparable to their school-year-level-appropriate native norms and be retained well over the first half of their compulsory schooling, the linguistic abilities that should develop further through primary school years show signs of stagnation (if not attrition) and such signs are much more prominent at the middle primary school year levels. This implies that in Australia where EnglishKorean bilingual education programs are not readily accessible to heritage speakers of Korean, it will be extremely difficult for them to develop high proficiency in Korean which requires mastery of complex grammatical aspects and extensive vocabulary. The results of this study not only alarm the Korean ethnolinguistic community in Australia and other stakeholders about the level of Korean language abilities developed and maintained by the heritage speakers in primary school years, but also provide detailed information on in which linguistic aspects they may have greater delays in the development, by which degree they show such delays and when the delays are likely to intensify over the course of primary school years.

  • (2020) Gleeson, Loughlin
    Thesis
    The overall aim of this dissertation is to programmatically set out a new reading of Hegel’s concept of freedom. The relevance of Hegel’s general conception of freedom will first be established against a historical-philosophical background comprised of certain competing conceptions of freedom; most notably, Hobbesian ‘liberty’ and Kantian ‘autonomy’ (Section I). Two prominent contemporary reconstructions of Hegelian freedom— namely, Robert Pippin’s post-Kantian model of ‘rational agency’ and Axel Honneth’s social-critical models of ‘individual self-realisation’ and ‘social freedom’—will then be set out and critically assessed in view of the criteria of exegetical accuracy and philosophical validity (Section II). By way of alternative, a holistic and immanent normative universalist reconstruction of Hegelian ‘concrete freedom’ will be adumbrated (Section III). Ultimately it will be argued that concrete freedom, by which Hegel means the relational achievement of genuine reconciliation obtaining between self and ‘constitutive other’, is both a holistic concept that embraces all of the forms of otherness upon which human subjects and the life-form in general are necessarily dependent (internal and external nature, other subjects and society) and the normative criterion or ideal against which the axiological desirability of such ontologically founded relations can be determined in a practically grounded yet theoretically defensible manner.

  • (2021) Hou, Jiarui
    Thesis
    The present study, using a combination of offline and online measures, compares the effects of reading on four media (mobile phone, tablet, computer, and paper) on incidental L2 word learning and L2 global reading comprehension. In the study, 156 Chinese L2 learners of English read a novel, The Elephant Man, under one of the four reading conditions (mobile phone: 41, tablet: 39, computer: 38, and paper: 38) while their eye movements were documented using a computer-mounted eye tracker or tracking glasses. The target words were 20 pseudo words repeated from one to six times across the reading text. We assessed global reading comprehension using 10 multiple-choice and 10 true/false items, and word knowledge using form recognition, meaning recognition, and meaning recall tests. We used eye movement measures to capture cognitive processes during reading. We assessed the processing of the whole text using mean fixation duration, fixation count, and total task time, and the processing of the target words using first fixation duration, gaze duration, and total reading time. The results demonstrated that word exposure and visual attention significantly predicted word knowledge gains. The processing time of the target words decreased as the number of encounters with the word increased. A strong positive correlation between word knowledge gains and global reading comprehension was established. We also found that the type of media affected learning performance and cognitive processes, and that reading on a computer negatively influenced form recognition and visual attention allocation to some extent. In particular, we found that reading on mobile phones and tablets led to similar results to reading on paper in both offline and online measures. The findings of this eye movement study add to the cognitive knowledge of incidental L2 word learning and L2 reading comprehension from L2 reading and also highlight the effects of medium on L2 learning and the underlying cognitive processes. This study defines the L2 research scenario in a mobile technological context, thus providing important insights into optimal mobile-assisted language learning, including online learning, e.g., during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

  • (2021) Li, Duoduo
    Thesis
    The co-activation of phonological representations in bilingual visual word recognition has been investigated in prior masked priming research in language pairs that are written in different scripts. However, the nature of cross-script phonological priming effects and the mechanisms underlying different-script bilingual visual word recognition are still unclear. The present thesis utilises the masked priming paradigm to investigate whether a cross-script phonological priming effect can be observed among Chinese– English and English–Chinese bilingual readers when silently reading in their L2. In addition, the thesis further examines the effects of target word frequency and L2 proficiency (by including beginning English–Chinese bilinguals as less proficient bilinguals) on the phonological priming effect. These issues are investigated in two independent consecutive studies, a Chinese–English study and an English–Chinese study, during which the eye-tracking data of bilingual readers was collected. In the Chinese–English study, Chinese–English bilingual participants made lexical decisions to English targets (e.g., may) preceded either by phonologically similar Chinese primes (e.g., 每/mei/) or by phonologically dissimilar Chinese primes (e.g., 杰/jie/), whereas in the subsequent English–Chinese study, English–Chinese bilingual participants made lexical decisions to Chinese targets (e.g., 好/hao/) paired with English primes (e.g., phonologically similar: how; phonologically dissimilar: ton). The lexical decision and eye-tracking data revealed a significant phonological priming effect in both the Chinese–English study and the English–Chinese study. The magnitude of the phonological priming effect was not modulated either by target word frequency, or by L2 proficiency even when beginning bilinguals were included. The findings of the thesis provide evidence for the co-activation of phonological representations in L2 visual word recognition with both Chinese–English and English–Chinese bilinguals, which is in line with previous findings and predictions of the Bilingual Interactive Activation Plus (BIA+) model. The methodological limitations and implications for the current bilingual lexical access framework and for reading instruction are discussed.

  • (2021) Judith, Kate
    Thesis
    Mangroves thrive in intertidal zones, where they gather together organisms and objects from land, river and ocean. They develop into complex ecologies in these dynamic in-between spaces. Mobilising resources drawn from semiotic materialism and the environmental humanities, this project seeks a form of social theory from the mangroves; that is to think interstitiality from the perspective of mangroves themselves, exploring the crafty and tenacious world making they are engaged in. I pursue three lines of inquiry, each of which approaches the in-between with a different, but overlapping set of questions. Part One focuses upon tides and filter-feeding to explore reflexivity as it is involved in becoming. Part Two follows the story of the relationship between a mosquito, a virus, a wallaby, and the author to present a distinct way of thinking relationality. Part Three explores the concept of difference by comparing mangrove and colonial settler approaches to colonising the banks of the Cooks River. The research contributes towards the revision of theory to support more-than-human futures. It is driven by the observation, derived from recent environmental humanities and ecocritical literature, that moving beyond anthropocentrism requires keeping open the in-between spaces of affect, inter-responsiveness and becoming-with. The thesis finds that semiotic material approaches which incorporate a folded or involutional ontology have practical applicability for shifting human thinking and decision making beyond an anthropocentric focus.