Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 36
  • (2020) De Oliveira Yonamine, Mariana
    Thesis
    When faced with culturally anchored terms, subtitlers can render the translation closer to the foreign language and culture, adopting a strategy of foreignization, or closer to the domestic audience, thus adhering to a strategy of domestication (Venuti, 1995). This dissertation examined how strategies of translation used to render idioms (Gottlieb, 1997) in interlingual subtitles affect viewer’s processing (Ghia, 2012; Perego, 2010; Kruger & Doherty, 2016), focusing on the effects of domestication and foreignization on translation form recognition (Bisson, 2013; Perego et al., 2010), and also exploring translation meaning recognition, audiovisual content processing, and viewer’s self-reported viewing experience. The investigation method was an online survey, answered by 79 native speakers of Brazilian Portuguese based in Australia. During the 25-minute experiment, participants watched an 11-minute movie-clip with scenes extracted from the Australian movie The Dish, with subtitles embedded including idioms translated using domesticated and foreignized strategies. Domestication resulted in statistically significantly higher translation form recognition. No significant difference in translation meaning recognition was verified between both translation conditions. Participants stated usage of audiovisual content for language learning showed significant interaction with translation form and meaning recognition. Participants processed effectively the experiment’s audiovisual content, dense in idioms, scoring high in general comprehension, face–name association, scene recognition, subtitle recognition. The self-reported cognitive and evaluative response of participants signalled satisfaction with subtitles and low difficulty and effort to follow them. The findings expand the evidence-based knowledge in the audiovisual translation field on subtitle processing and the effects of translation strategies on the subtitles as a product. Based upon these findings, it is argued that the domestication of idioms could be used to promote targeted use of translation strategies to accelerate learning using subtitles (Pavesi & Perego, 2008; Ghia, 2012; Ragni, 2018), for purposes that could benefit from higher translation recognition, as language learning, didactic videos or informative material, as public health or community service campaigns. For other uses in which conveying meaning is deemed sufficient, as entertainment, the findings suggest that domestication or foreignization yield similar meaning recognition. The dissertation concludes by presenting the limitations of the experiment and avenues for future research.

  • (2020) Harper, Mitchell
    Thesis
    This thesis investigates Deleuze’s genetic account of real experience in Difference and Repetition (hereafter DR) as a systematic form of metaphysics. While there is broad agreement on the aims of DR as a thesis in metaphysics, there is significant disparity in accounts of how this is accomplished. The overall goal of this thesis is to examine and clarify the processes involved in Deleuze’s metaphysical account of genesis in DR (the three syntheses of time and space, differentiation, individuation, differenciation, and dramatisation), how these processes involve a metaphysics of difference (intensive quantity), how they form a system (the relationship between the virtual, the actual, and the intensive), and how this has been understood in the secondary scholarship. Chapter 1 examines Deleuze’s reading of Kantian critique for two reasons. Firstly, it outlines Kant’s account of the conditioning of possible experience in order to provide a framework from which to understand how Deleuze radically transforms transcendental philosophy. Secondly, it critically examines Deleuze’s reading of Kant’s genetic account of real experience in order to outline its philosophical limitations. Chapter 2 explores Deleuze’s reconstructive reading of Nietzsche’s metaphysics of becoming as a rewrite of Kantian critique in order to show, on the one hand, that a metaphysical account of transcendental genesis necessitates a theory of time that attempts to grasp the perpetual emergence of the absolutely new, and on the other, that it provides a preliminary sketch of Deleuze’s own metaphysical system in DR. Chapter 3 aims to illuminate the three syntheses of time in Chapter 2 of DR by examining both how they form an interdependent unity and how they have been interpreted in the secondary scholarship. Chapter 4 analyses the secondary scholarship on DR and puts forward a novel interpretation of Deleuze’s metaphysics by arguing, on the one hand, that individuation signifies a process of intensive quantity split between differentiation (the virtual) and differenciation (the actual), such that, intensities comprise both the virtual and the actual, and on the other, that this entails a metaphysical (or panpsychist) conception of thought that involves a parallelism between Ideas and sensibility.

  • (2021) Miller, Gretchen
    Thesis
    What is the experience of being a rescuer of damaged landscapes and broken creatures, at a time of environmental crisis in Australia? How do individuals and grassroots communities go about small acts of rescue, and how do they maintain the courage to do this work? The Rescue Project is practice-based research. It includes a public digital storytelling site of 51 text-based rescuer story contributions, alongside a podcast of four episodes, plus an exegesis providing critical reflection and analysis of the creative practice and the resultant thematic threads. The digital site was constructed in partnership with the non-government, volunteer-based, land regeneration organisation Landcare Australia. This practice and exegesis contribute new thinking to the scholarship of environmental communication by considering the meaning of rescue, providing insights into the affectual themes of acts of rescue, articulating rescue relations, and introducing and developing several key terms: ecosonics, homeground, and citizen storytelling. The themes which emerge from this project reveal the emotional affects and effects of undertaking rescues, and suggest rescues take place within three related and iterative overarching themes. Firstly, the theme of humility that is required to begin an act of rescue. Secondly, the theme of attunement that builds resonances with both sentient figures and non-sentient features of homegrounds. Finally, the theme of courage to undertake rescue activities, and courage’s iterative outcome, encouragement. Further, this practice and exegesis contribute to environmental communication through foregrounding listening and hearing, the spoken word, community storytelling, and the ecosonics of the more-than-human world. In giving space to the methodological processes of my creative practice, this exegesis offers environmental communication practitioners new ways to go about their work. It also responds to current calls within this scholarship for a listening modality: for too long we have been deaf to the sounds of the more-than-human world. The Rescue Project is a demonstration of how we might humbly hear these worlds speak. To explore the digital space, please visit: https://web.archive.org/web/20210530042604/https://landcareaustralia.org.au/rescue/

  • (2020) Buckle, Caitlin
    Thesis
    Understanding migrants' lived experiences are integral to explorations of lifestyle migration. Examining mobility experiences over the entire life course enables insight into decision-making processes, how lifestyle migration may link to childhood experiences, as well as to life stage and tourism-related mobilities. Capturing the rich detail of migration(s) as lived experience, thus requires specialised research design that not only charts migration trajectories, but also synthesises the various components of migrants' mobile lives over their life course. The papers presented as part of this thesis draw from an innovative research design. Participants recalled their lived experiences over their life course using narratives, visual imagery and virtual visitation. One part of the method drew from in-depth biographical interview data with international and domestic migrants to Maroochy in Queensland, Australia. During the interviews, each participant narrated their residential moves over their life course. Our experiential journeys navigated multiple homes and places, lived and left as a migration biography. In positioning the places lived and left as important to the most recent migration decisions to move to Maroochy, I also reflected on my own migration biography - from Maroochy - and the influence of my situated knowledge. The visual and virtual components of the research method provided a platform to advance the use of geospatial technologies in presenting migrants' experiences. Using Google Earth satellite imagery, participants' migration narratives proceeded alongside their visitation of past residences, and their accompanying place-based stories. I recorded this synchronous combination of oral narrative with visual journey using audio and screen-capture software, and created mapped migration biographies combining the transcribed narratives and satellite imagery. I discuss the difficulties and opportunities for using geospatial technologies to represent migrants' experiences. Digital mapping added visual, multiscalar, tactile and mobile aspects to the migration narratives, providing opportunity for virtual visitation of past migrations. The participants interacted with the interface as a 'digital body', (re)performing their lived experiences of migration. A key thesis finding relates to how the method extended the capacities of oral and textual analysis to incorporate the visual features and spatialities of my participants' mobile lives.

  • (2021) Vitale, Luke
    Thesis
    This thesis presents a new history of Italian immigration to Australia that roughly covers the period between the Intercolonial Conference on the Chinese Question held in 1888 and the beginning of World War II in 1940. It argues that the presence of Italian migrants in Australia, as workers and settlers, was tied to White Australia’s three main agendas: creating a racially homogenous white population, securing British/Australian possession of the continent, and developing a modern industrial capitalist economy. While contributing positively towards the achievement of these goals, their presence also represented a contradiction for White Australia. As a result, despite being acceptable and sometimes even desirable within the co-ordinates of White Australia, their presence was contested and always needed to be re-affirmed by supporters of Italian immigration and by Italians themselves. From these contestations over Italians’ desirability in White Australia, emerged a number of constructions such as pioneer, settler, citizen and defender that highlighted certain characteristics such as race, class, labour practices and respectability. Through an analysis of newspaper articles in both English and Italian, the parliamentary Hansard and a variety of government archives, this thesis examines how these constructions emerged out of the political and class conflicts of White Australia. It also examines the role Italians played in the creation and propagation of these constructions and how this was informed by their own ideas about race and labour that were influenced by a variety of political ideologies and class positions that divided the body of Italian migrants in Australia during this period.

  • (2021) Xia, Jing
    Thesis
    This thesis examines Lu Xun’s last short story collection, Old Tales Retold, from the perspective of influence from the translations Lu Xun’s made from foreign languages on the composition and content of his own short stories and essay. Examples include Akutagawa Ryūnosuke’s “Rashōmon”; Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Kuriyagawa Hakuson’s literary theory, Symbols of Anguish; as well as Tsurumi Yūsuke’s cultural critique, Thought, Landscape and Characters. Chinese mythology, the works of Wang Chong, Sima Qian and Zhuangzi are also sources and materials Lu Xun draws on in Old Tales Retold. Inspired by literary techniques and ideas from these sources, Lu Xun creates a brand new style of modern story whose satire targets both antiquity and the present, serving his ultimate purpose of criticising of the Chinese national character. The first chapter is a detailed analysis of the first story “Mending Heaven”, focusing on techniques and images Lu Xun borrows from Akutagawa Ryūnosuke and Nietzsche, and an ongoing theme throughout the collection of failed communication. The second chapter interprets the stories, “The Flight to the Moon” and “Forging the Swords”, in terms of symbolism in Kuriyagawa Hakuson’s Symbols of Anguish. The two stories, based on Lu Xun’s own experience, reveals the writer’s anxiety over his family life and reflection on the spiritual revolution he personally engages in. An analysis of the remaining five stories is included in the last chapter, detailing Lu Xun’s criticism of certain characteristic traits of the Chinese intelligentsia and his covet criticism of China’s dictatorship in two political allegories, “Gathering Vetch” and “Curbing the Flood”. The cruelty inherent in wangdao 王道 (the Kingly Way) and the truth behind shanrang 禅让 (abdication in favour of the worthy) are the focal points of these two allegories respectively. In addition, Lu Xun’s endeavour to promote a language for the masses (dazhong yu 大众语) and put it into practise it in the last story “Resurrecting the Dead”, is also discussed. In conclusion, Old Tales Retold can be deemed as Lu Xun’s criticism of the Chinese national character in a story form. The epitomisation of characters of various social classes, briefly and ingeniously depicted through their conversations and actions in this collection, highlights positive characteristic traits of sincerity, faithfulness, rationality and sacrifice, as opposed to negative ones such as glibness, self-aggrandisement, withdrawal and vulgarity in the Chinese. Tsurumi Yūsuke’s view that liberalism must be based on individuality, contributes to Lu Xun’s unique perspective on reforming the national character through language as a significant pathway towards a liberal society.

  • (2022) Ayshan, Han
    Thesis
    Video game trailers are an effective promotional form of intermediation that enables audiences to navigate and engage with old and new media. Although video game trailers function as advertisements designed to sell a game, they are also stories that provoke social media commentary and debate. Trailers aim to draw the viewer in, convey sound and imagery, and evoke an involuntary reaction of excitement and awe. In this thesis, I will be using the games Fallout 4, Watch Dogs 2, and Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate. In the case studies, I investigate how viewers make sense of the promotional and storytelling aspects of video game trailers. I examine how video game trailers have the potential to arouse emotions and interest before viewers even play the game. Trailers provide an insight into the basic gameplay, not only into the gameplay but also into the story and the characters (protagonists and antagonists). They show audiences the video game theme genre and provide the viewer with a visual and auditory tool to entice possession. This project explores these themes, showing how video game trailers have an inherited cinematic quality but also how trailers actually spend little time presenting actual gameplay. There is a clear connection with movie trailers, teasing the events that will take place in the game and asking the player what will happen next. In this study, I used the methods of narrative analysis and textual analysis to analyse comments from YouTube, Facebook, and a survey of video gamers. The textual analysis of the trailers raises questions of representation and authenticity. In this research, I identified an incongruity between the representation of the core features of a game and the promotion of those features in the trailer. The narrative analysis of the trailers focused on storytelling and emplotment in the trailers. A key theme that has emerged from the analysis is that superheroes engage in vigilantism, a justifiable form of self-administered violence. Gamers may feel at ease with the violence used to correct perceived injustices. There is potential for gamers to consider the moral grey area of vigilante violence and romanticised vigilantism. With their enhanced ability to simulate complex interactive narratives for actual and simulated authenticity, video games offer a sophisticated engagement with players that contributes significantly to their widespread and universal support. The role of culturally created characters in the experience of playing a video game helps stimulate philosophical research. I explore whether normative audience expectations can speed up the development of cultural expectations about the relationship between the player and the narrative of the game and its audience. In this context, I examine case study video game trailers and ask what it means to revise our understanding of the relationship between power, law, and morality while playing the game. I examine and critique how the narrative, and thus the mechanics of a specific game, shapes our understanding of connection, power, law, or morality; I contend that prestige reflects normative privilege and law.

  • (2022) Jung, Sin Ji
    Thesis
    Sparked by the interesting observation of non-native acquisition of heritage languages despite early and continuous exposure, the study of heritage languages has endeavoured to explore the end results of heritage language acquisition while mostly neglecting the pathway that heritage speakers undergo before arriving in that state. This study investigated how the heritage language develops and is maintained over primary school years in heritage speakers of Korean who grow up in Australia. Linguistic abilities in Korean of 243 heritage speakers of Korean of primary school age in Australia, compared to their school-year-level-matched native speakers of Korean in the Republic of Korean (South Korea), have been examined in the three broad linguistic areas of the sound system, lexis and grammar with a battery of tasks. The results of the tasks indicated that the heritage speakers generally fell behind the native speakers in the linguistic abilities in Korean examined but their gap to the native speaker controls differed between the linguistic areas examined. Regarding the sound system, the heritage speakers did not show reliably lower perception of speech sounds in Korean than those of the native speakers, and their speech sound perception, which is supposed to have developed and been stabilised in early childhood, appeared to be retained well over primary school years. On the contrary, they exhibited a great shortfall in lexical knowledge in Korean compared to their native speaker peers, and this gap appeared to widen from the middle primary school year levels where the lexical knowledge of the native speakers expands explosively. In comparison, their linguistic abilities in grammar exhibited a varying degree of divergence to the native speaker norms by linguistic aspect. The results suggested that they acquired basic syntactic structures and semantic features that develop early in first language acquisition of Korean to a level comparable to that of their native speaker peers and their understanding of sentences made of such linguistic aspects was maintained well over the primary school period. In contrast, they exhibited a considerable delay in the acquisition of certain grammatical aspects that are mastered relatively late by the native speakers, and the heritage speakers’ acquisition of these aspects did not seem to progress greatly over primary school years. They also showed a substantial gap to the native speaker controls in understanding passive sentences and scrambled active sentences, and this gap is likely to have arisen from their greater processing difficulty. Mostly paralleling the linguistic abilities of adult heritage speakers attested in previous research, the results of this study underline that the linguistic abilities in Korean of heritage speakers of Korean in Australia diverge from their (age- or) school-year-level-appropriate native norms already in their primary school years. Although the linguistic aspects that are mastered early in first language acquisition such as phoneme distinction or basic syntactic structures seem to be acquired to a level comparable to their school-year-level-appropriate native norms and be retained well over the first half of their compulsory schooling, the linguistic abilities that should develop further through primary school years show signs of stagnation (if not attrition) and such signs are much more prominent at the middle primary school year levels. This implies that in Australia where EnglishKorean bilingual education programs are not readily accessible to heritage speakers of Korean, it will be extremely difficult for them to develop high proficiency in Korean which requires mastery of complex grammatical aspects and extensive vocabulary. The results of this study not only alarm the Korean ethnolinguistic community in Australia and other stakeholders about the level of Korean language abilities developed and maintained by the heritage speakers in primary school years, but also provide detailed information on in which linguistic aspects they may have greater delays in the development, by which degree they show such delays and when the delays are likely to intensify over the course of primary school years.

  • (2020) Gleeson, Loughlin
    Thesis
    The overall aim of this dissertation is to programmatically set out a new reading of Hegel’s concept of freedom. The relevance of Hegel’s general conception of freedom will first be established against a historical-philosophical background comprised of certain competing conceptions of freedom; most notably, Hobbesian ‘liberty’ and Kantian ‘autonomy’ (Section I). Two prominent contemporary reconstructions of Hegelian freedom— namely, Robert Pippin’s post-Kantian model of ‘rational agency’ and Axel Honneth’s social-critical models of ‘individual self-realisation’ and ‘social freedom’—will then be set out and critically assessed in view of the criteria of exegetical accuracy and philosophical validity (Section II). By way of alternative, a holistic and immanent normative universalist reconstruction of Hegelian ‘concrete freedom’ will be adumbrated (Section III). Ultimately it will be argued that concrete freedom, by which Hegel means the relational achievement of genuine reconciliation obtaining between self and ‘constitutive other’, is both a holistic concept that embraces all of the forms of otherness upon which human subjects and the life-form in general are necessarily dependent (internal and external nature, other subjects and society) and the normative criterion or ideal against which the axiological desirability of such ontologically founded relations can be determined in a practically grounded yet theoretically defensible manner.

  • (2022) Conrad, Vanessa
    Thesis
    Introduction: The fashion industry is now the second largest polluter in the world. Extensive research has quantified those damages, yet little progress has been made to prevent this calamity. This thesis profiled the global value chain (GVC) and producer narratives of hemp fashion goods produced by various micro-social ventures in Nepal, with a particular focus on the producers and their role in sustainable production. The goal was to address the call of fashion consumers for more transparency in the apparel industry through an investigation of the manifestations of sustainable development (SD), and environmental and social justice. The study examines if these goals were achievable by ethical and sustainable (E&S) practices based on the promises of grow-ing awareness towards a new movement of fashion eco-awareness. Methods: This thesis applied a human-centred GVC investigation framework based on a multi-methods approach which combined fieldwork, semi-structured and struc-tured interviews, and questionnaires. Fourteen workers, producers, and consumers answered a range of approximately twenty questions subdivided into four categories: 1. epistemology (to understand their ecological awareness), 2. people (to understand ethical values), 3. planet (to understand sustainable practices) and 4. profit (to under-stand their financial status). The trajectory of hemp in its various stages of economic ‘value-adding’ from cultivation until the final product reached the end-consumer in Australia was investigated. A literature review examined the historical underpin-nings of the E&S fashion movement; environmental and humanitarian issues related to the GVC of the fashion industry; and the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the hemp crop in Nepal’s local communities. Results: The findings confirmed that E&S fashion guidelines of the hemp trade in Nepal had a positive influence on consumers' behaviour, cultural preservation and exchange, sustainable development, fair trade and environmental practices. Remark-ably, workers and producers from Nepal expressed greater concern with the ecology of hemp production than with their personal finances. Conclusion: Firstly, the results show that workers and business owners from Nepal are aware of the environmental damage caused by the fashion industry and are engag-ing with E&S labels to create more environmentally conscious products. Secondly, this thesis confirms that although consumer behaviour research indicates that fashion consumers want to make more E&S choices (BWA-AU, 2020), they cannot do so due to their inability to access vital information about the products they buy. This is because a globalised economy comes with many unknowns for the consumers, who remain sceptical and despite their efforts find it difficult to practice conscious consumerism. Finally, this investigation also served to demystify the often misunderstood crop (hemp) as a commodity and underline its benevolence and capacity to foster benefit-sharing activities.