Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 4697
  • (2007) Segal, Arlene
    Conference Paper
    Adopting an empirical teaching/working experience against an urban design theory backdrop, this paper investigates ‘Design Thinking’ from a personal view. It explores the interplay between the different design disciplines and offers an interpretation on how the lines between them blur and how they may connect(ED) through teaching programs. A brief history of urban design introduces the subject, demonstrates the dynamic forces of the city, touches on the ongoing tussle for definition of Urban Design and ultimate recognition of it’s distinction from Architecture, Planning & Landscape Architecture as an independent profession. Once the lines are drawn, it is time to move on and acknowledge the indispensable value of crossing the lines & connecting design fields, a function that recognises; ‘…that designing is a multi-layered thing, to be learned slowly, layer by layer, but designers must combine all the layers at once, and understand their interaction…’ (Venturi2004) It is this layering that requires a learning experience and the input of a ‘thousand designers’ in order to create rich and meaningful built environments. With the advent of information technology the design process has been accelerated and the sharp lines of separation between the design disciplines are blurring. A powerful common visual tool has been created that encourages a cross communication of design ideas and broadens the scope for discovery, invention and connection. The educational imperative is determined through a program aimed at a holistic approach to urban design, available to students across the design disciplines in the Faculty of the Built Environment. The philosophy is based on communicating new visual insights, through an interactive participation program that draws on the valuable contribution of personal experiences of students on the course. The program, as a Seminar offers an appreciation of the complexity of the subject through understanding the parts; as in-situ investigations, readings, discussion, drawing, debate & presentation. The focus is the fascination of urban design interventions in the 21st Century and the propensity for rapid change as part of the dynamic process of cities. Intrinsic to the program are primary links to Planning, Architecture and Landscape Architecture in addition to diverse design associated activities. ‘…the new millennium will depend on the creation of bridges that unite conservation technology with an earthcentric philosophy and the capacity of designers to transform these integrated forces into a new visual language’ (Wines 2000: 236).

  • (2007) MacMahon, William
    Conference Paper
    Since the year 2000 Matthew Johnson, artist, and myself, Bill MacMahon, architect and lecturer in the Interior Architecture program at UNSW, have been collaborating upon the incorporation of artworks into buildings. Such multidisciplinary work is having a direct outcome upon my architectural design practice and my work in design studio with Interior Architecture students. As interior architects often work in collaborative teams involving the development of their ideas designs within the work of architects so the work of Matthew and myself might act as a model for Interior Architecture practice. Lessons learnt in the negotiations of changes to architect’s designs can be taught to students of Interior Architecture. It offers lessons in the contextualization of design.

  • (2007) Alic, Dijana
    Conference Paper
    This paper discusses the relevance of historical studies to the ways that architects and architecture students approach the issue of interpretation and representation of "Other". It examines how an architect's "placement" informs the construction and reproduction of architectural knowledge. Adopting a flexible historical framework the paper explores three selected cases of cultural encounters between architects and the historic precinct of Baščaršija, the Ottoman established core of the city of Sarajevo. With the objective of gaining a historically grounded awareness of the complexities of cultural identities the paper considers: (1) The design studio teachings of the well-known Slovenian architect and academic Jože Plečnik who advocated the study of historic architecture as an essential part of an architect's education. (2) The attempts by Plečnik's student and colleague Dušan Grabrijan to open up the terms of engagement with history and allow for a more fluent interpretation of what constituted an understanding of place and its history by introducing the ideas of space, volume and culture. (3) The positions taken by the two architects are finally considered in their relationship to the understanding of the cultural and historical context of Baščaršija presented by the third and fourth year architecture students at UNSW, Sydney Australia in their design of the Town Hall building in Sarajevo. The students' physical and cultural distance from the specifics of the site led to the simultaneous promotion and contestation of the relevance of the historic studies and context analysis.

  • (2007) Ward, Stephen
    Conference Paper
    Industrial designers use various types of drawings, computer illustrations and physical models to represent the things they are designing. These representations are used not only to communicate a design to others but also for the designer to evaluate and stimulate their own thinking. A design process is usually facilitated by movement between different types of representations to explore different aspects of the design. Sometimes, however, student industrial designers appear to become stuck in their design process, favouring one type of design representation and not using another that may have been more informative at the time. In particular, we have noticed students making inadequate use of scale drawings to check the size and arrangement of the elements of a design. This paper presents two examples of teaching and learning scale drawing that are intended to emphasise its role particularly within the early, exploratory stages of a design process. In the first example students were required to measure the external shape of an existing product and then make a 3D model that represents the shape through a sequence of crosssections. A scale drawing of the surface contours of the original object was a necessary step in this process. In the second example students used 2D CAD to make a technical drawing of an object with some moving parts. The drawings were then developed into a sequence to make a “flip book” animation of the movement. In both cases the intention was to create a design project in which measurement and scale drawing were a necessary step towards achieving a successful outcome. The principles underlying the development of these learning experiences are discussed in this paper.

  • (2007) Murray, Peter
    Conference Paper
    The practice of architecture is a complex undertaking drawing on knowledge of and skills in history, theory, environment, human behaviour, services, structure, materials, construction, communications, law, management and more. Professional accreditation requires that all architecture programs recognize and address this diversity of topics within their curricula although the order, emphasis and content detail may vary widely between programs. However this material is dealt with, it is in the design studio that, ideally, all will be manifest in the work students present. Assuming a sound knowledge and understanding of architectural technologies are essential to the creation of successful architecture it is suggested that these are seldom sufficiently acknowledged in the design studio. Based on survey data from University of New South Wales (UNSW) architecture graduands, the first part of the paper reviews factors perceive by students to be significant to their performance in the design studio. In particular it draws attention to the role of the tutor and a perceived lack of recognition given to architectural technologies. In the context of the survey findings, the second part of the paper reflects on two specialist elective technology/design courses available to senior students. The projects are specifically designed to achieve a greater recognition of structural and construction issues in both the design outcome and course assessment.

  • (2007) Clarke, Karina
    Conference Paper
    This paper discusses a studio-based lighting design project developed for second year undergraduate students in a four year design degree. The project is intended to develop student understanding of the technological and manufacturing requirements of the professional design process and has been repeated each year over a three year period during which time student responses have been gathered and changes made in response to student feedback. This paper highlights the benefits of real world experiences in the early stage of design education by extending the traditions of hypothetically and conceptually rich briefs, which impacts on the student’s future design process. The lighting project is based on a client brief/s that range from architectural lighting for commercial applications to lighting systems for emergency services. The project includes lighting workshops that explore the technical and ephemeral qualities of light and provides students with hands-on experience of industrial/manufacturing processes. It also extends understanding on the role of collaboration in obtaining a professional outcome, i.e. (producing working prototypes for exhibition). Students are required to source quotations from industry thus affording a tangible outcome and an understanding of the financial implications of their design outputs. Final working prototypes are presented in a public exhibition space, designed and co-ordinated by the student group. The educational benefits of ‘real world’ experiences gained by the students and its impact on their design process is analysed. Student evaluations are discussed in response to the project brief, including their response to working with industry. In addition, how the results have enabled a refinement to the project over time. By embedding opportunities for students to engage in industrial processes outside of the university they are more likely to assume a professional focus, share knowledge and engage in each other’s experiences rather than focus on individual achievements and grades.

  • (2007) Garbutt, Michael
    Conference Paper
    To develop effective design solutions for end users whose life experiences, health, mobility, and cognitive functions are significantly different to our own, we must recognize and challenge our assumptions about those users. When we set out to inspire novice designers to practice in a field widely considered as he height of ‘uncool’, we also challenge beliefs about the nature of design itself. Introducing young novice designers to ‘Elder Design, (ED) i.e. design responses to the needs of people over the age of 65, achieves both these goals. It also meets a rapidly ageing society’s requirement for designers with an understanding of this user group. This paper presents an analysis of a graduating student’s design for a chair intended for residents’ use in a residential aged care facility (RACF) in south-western Sydney). Effective design solutions in this area require a multidisciplinary approach involving an understanding of environment-behaviour relationships, the ageing process, dementia, nursing practices, operations research, and ergonomic design for user groups with highly specific (but varied) needs. In addition to the end users, ED introduces students to clients such as RACF operators, who are themselves experiencing rapid change in the types of the services they provide and the care models which inform them. In this context, effective problemsolving begins with problem identification -- for all parties. Evaluated via interview and the analysis of design outcomes, the project provides an insight into possible approaches to developing education for user-centred design solutions across many fields.

  • (2007) Serle, Sue; Mate, Kirsty
    Conference Paper
    The Faculty was invited to participate in ‘Dining Design’, an international exhibition which explored ideas of dining culture in different international cities and proposed future possibilities. This paper looks at an independent learning, interdisciplinary approach to teaching, using a real project with an interface between education, industry and design practice.

  • (2008) Murphet, Julian Sean
    Journal Article
    P.T. Anderson's latest film, There Will Be Blood, represents both a culmination and a crisis within his career-long investigation of the limits of paternity and the solace of surrogacy. By pressing that ongoing antagonism to a kind of absurd extreme in Daniel Day Lewis' performance, this paper argues that Anderson undoes it and leaves his future possible direction unclear. Further, by battening on the corpus of Upton Sinclair's 1926 novel, Anderson introduces a political unconscious that his rigorous reduction to a family drama cannot fully contain or defuse.

  • (2008) Murphet, Julian Sean
    Journal Article
    In Voice, Image, Television: Beckett’s Divided Screens Julian Murphet makes the case for a ‘modernist moment’ in 70s television culture, arguing for Samuel Beckett as its great (if somewhat surprising) exemplar. Murphet suggests that the persistence of black and white televisions in British and American living rooms in the 1960s and 1970s at the same time as colour television’s rise to dominance, maps on to a more generally accepted pattern for the relationship between modernism and postmodernism. Through a close of analysis of Beckett’s works for television, Murphet reveals that such pieces as Eh Joe illustrate a televisual modernism that has mostly gone unrecorded by critics. More specifically, in terms of the writer’s creative practice, Murphet examines how through his work for television Beckett methodically investigates the possibilities and limitations of the medium, and in doing so unclogs aesthetic blockages that had beset his own work.