Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 46
  • (2021) Harvey, Justin
    Thesis
    An Impossible Present: The Indivisible Time of Video Feedback Art is a practice-based research project that investigates the capacity of artists to impact our understanding of the thing around which much of our conscious experience is structured yet which cannot be grasped: time. It consists of the iterative creation of four artworks along with a written thesis examining historic and contemporary artistic practices, including my own, that employ video feedback. I interrogate artists’ conceptual preoccupations, the processes they use and their aesthetic outcomes using novel applications of philosopher Henri Bergson’s philosophy of consciousness and time to provide new understandings of their work. Bergson argues that conscious existence can be understood as the indivisible continuity of change, which he calls duration, and yet we divide all things as a means of control over the material world, including time. I argue that specific artworks that utilise video feedback provoke a certain way of thinking about, or indeed experiencing time contrary to the usual way that video is used to divide it. I make use of three interpretations of Bergson’s philosophy, media theorist Mark B. N. Hansen’s reformulation of Bergson’s thinking to account for digital video technology, transdisciplinary critical philosopher David Kreps’ alignment of Bergson’s theory of evolution with developments in evolutionary biology, and philosopher Michel Serres’ extension of Bergson’s theory of time as indivisible to an understanding of time as manifold. Each interpretation is brought into relation with one of the artworks I produced as part of this research along with the artworks of others. In the hands of the artists discussed throughout this thesis, the video feedback loop becomes a metaphor for human consciousness and through the shaping of these loops, they create artworks that move toward restoring the quality of indivisibility to the concept, and indeed experience, of time.

  • (2021) Phan, Do Quynh Tram
    Thesis
    The emergence of English as a global language has had a considerable impact on national education curricula in many non-English-speaking countries, including Vietnam. Recently, the Ministry of Education and Training in Vietnam has introduced the new English communication-oriented curriculum for upper-secondary education; however, little is known about how the new curriculum is perceived and enacted by EFL teachers at the classroom level. An interpretive multiple case study design was employed to investigate how participant EFL teachers perceived and enacted the new curriculum; and explore the influences that conditioned these processes in the rural, suburban and urban areas in Vietnam. The current study adopted cultural-historical activity theory (Engeström, 1993, 2014; Leont’ev, 1978, 1981) as its theoretical lens to shed light on EFL teachers’ experiences of curriculum reform. Qualitative data were generated through multiple interviews, classroom observations and documentations over seven months. The findings revealed that the teachers’ enactment of the curriculum was a socially mediated activity. The teachers aspired and struggled to enact the curriculum within the pull of the status quo. The enactment processes were non-static, dynamic and highly individualised through the teachers’ agentive engagement in the negotiation process between the old and new practices. The study identified a wide range of inter-related influences from personal, school, and broader socio-cultural contexts of teachers’ work that conditioned the teachers’ experiences of the curriculum reform. The results of this study suggest that policymakers inadequately considered teachers’ perspectives and the realities of their work in the curriculum planning and implementation process, which led to the challenges of its implementation at the local level. The thesis concludes with the implications for language policy planning and for the implementation of teacher support in response to curriculum change. It argues for the need to conceptualise teachers’ enactment of the curriculum in the socio-cultural context of teacher’s work for achievement of the desired curriculum implementation outcomes.

  • (2021) Murney, Anastasia
    Thesis
    Over the last decade, there has been rising interest in speculative fiction in contemporary art practice. These practices are appearing in a context where the future is being contested through resurgent patriarchal nationalism, ongoing settler-colonialism and the uneven distribution of environmental crisis. This thesis examines a group of artistic practices that use speculative fiction to navigate these spatial and geopolitical complexities: Pussy Riot, Larissa Sansour, Nicoline van Harskamp and Adelita Husni-Bey. Each artist responds to a specific context and builds on a different branch of the speculative, from magic and witchcraft to feminist science fiction and Afrofuturism. The outcome, I argue, is a revitalised anarcha-feminist subjectivity that is critical and creative enough for the present. This is mapped through a suite of speculative figures that straddle fiction and activism—holy fools, witches, healers, terrorists, pirates, and time-travellers, to name a few. Drawing on political, geographical and feminist scholarship to analyse Pussy Riot, Sansour, van Harskamp and Husni-Bey, I locate their work in the fraught space between nationalism and neoliberalism. I argue that these practices reflect a growth of what I call shadow geographies: para-state formations that obfuscate state and corporate actors. They foreground the need for an anarcha-feminism that responds to this changing distribution of power. In contrast to tidy schemas that centralise masculine subjects, the method I develop by analysing these practices privileges mess, misrepresentation and mistranslation. This creates space for alternative subjects that subvert the hegemonic flow of space and time. The original contribution I am making opens a dialogue between anarcha-feminist subjectivities, contemporary art practices and the geographical complexities of the present. Further, I insist on speculative fiction as the motor that animates this subjectivity. Rather than offering escapist or apolitical fantasies, these artists do not eschew struggle or contradiction. In emphasising how their work is anchored in material, geopolitical realities, this contributes to a grounding of speculative fiction. Perhaps there are no clean or clear lines of exit from global capitalism but there is much to be gained from taking the speculative seriously.

  • (2012) Robson, Charmaine
    Thesis
    Between 1937 and 1986, Australian Indigenous people diagnosed with Hansen's disease (leprosy) were compulsorily isolated under the care of Catholic religious nursing Sisters in remote leprosaria across the north of the continent. This thesis explores the forces that gave rise to and maintained this policy; the underlying ideals and anxieties; and the ways the policy was executed across the four institutions that form the focus of the study: Derby (WA), Fantome Island (QLD), and Channel Island and East Arm (both NT). Missionary archival documents, oral histories and publications are used to examine the lives, work and traditions of the Sisters and other influential Catholic missionaries. Government records also reveal medical and social objectives implicit in the founding, staffing and ongoing operations of the institutions. Comparisons are made with management strategies for white Hansen's disease patients in Australia to unravel prevailing conceptions about the separate categories of race and disease. The Indigenous leprosaria derived from the Commonwealth government's interwar vision of a healthy White Australia, and the supervision and treatment of the inmates was considered a necessary corollary to this initiative. Catholic women religious were uniquely positioned for this role, being prepared for the incumbent risks, and having the requisite nursing and midwifery qualifications, resulting from a current upsurge in Catholic missionary activity in northern Australia. The Sisters expanded their nursing duties to encompass the holistic care of their patients and to educate them in Western skills, culture and morality. They ushered in the more intensive participation of Catholic Brothers and priests in evangelising the patients. In many ways the Catholic project aligned with government objectives for the social assimilation of the Indigenous population, but in the leprosarium, the object of such efforts was that ‘civilised’ and ‘Christianised’ residents would comply stoically with their enforced detention. Prescribed activities, whether hard work or leisure, were to keep patients occupied, diffusing their yearnings for home, and offering a gentler alternative to more punitive controlling measures. In later years, the Sisters became modern therapists, and agitators for better conditions and less stringent discharge criteria, thus more effectively helping patients regain their health and independence.

  • (2021) Heyrani, Farzad
    Thesis
    Museums are important cultural sites in cities to attract visitors. The physical context of museum buildings is essential in shaping the visitor experience, and it is important to understand the spatial and display layout and its impact on visitors’ experience. This thesis analyses the selected case study, the National Museum of Australia. It investigates the relationship between museum spatial properties and visitors’ movement and the influence of movement patterns on visitors’ experience to determine how the museum’s architectural characteristics affect visitors’ experience. Unlike extensive research in spatial and visitor experience studies, few studies have combined qualitative and quantitative assessment to understand visitors’ perspective of the museum visit. Unlike previous studies that only focus on behaviour mapping, this study included interviews with visitors to explore visitors’ experience and clearly explain the visitor perspective. Mixed-methods of data collection are used in the study, including the quantitative and qualitative assessments of the National Museum of Australia. In the quantitative analysis, space syntax techniques were used to assess the spatial characteristics of the museum. In the qualitative analysis, two types of data were used. First, behaviour mapping of 30 visitors in each gallery of the museum was used to record visitors’ movement patterns. Second, interviews were conducted with ten visitors who had completed their museum visit. The findings indicate that the difference in the layout of each of the four permanent galleries and the main hall resulted in various museum movement patterns and different visitor experiences. The results show a direct correlation between spatial characteristics, such as visibility, integration and connectivity, and visitors’ experience, encouraging visitors to move toward more integrated and visible space. The main recommendation to improve visitor experience is to increase the accessibility and visibility toward the garden to create the integration core for the museum. This combined approach illustrates how differences in layouts can create different visitor experience in the same environment. In conclusion, the study of spatial and display layout enables designers and curators to better evaluate the movement pattern of visitors and provide a better quality of experience, improving the museum’s ability to convey its messages.

  • (2021) Ullah, Fahim
    Thesis
    Real Estate Online Platforms (REOPs) are responsible for providing property-related information to their users. However, most of these users are not satisfied with the information provided to them. This thesis highlights the REOP users’ needs and regrets and the pertinent disruptive digital technologies (DDTs) to address these needs. Two models are developed for assessing the REOPs users’ perception and the two-way relationship between them. Also, the barriers to adoption of the DDTs from a managerial perspective are examined. For assessing the users’ perception, Smart Real Estate Technology Adoption Model (SRETAM) is developed, whereas Risk, Service, Information, System TAM (RSISTAM) is developed to assess the two-way relationship between the perceptions. Concepts of KANO and SISQual are used to assess the perceptions, whereas Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) is used for assessing the potential two-way relationships. The barriers to adoption of the DDTs are analysed through Fault Tree Analysis. These models, coupled with the users’ needs and DDT adoption barriers, constitute the novel framework adopted in this study. Eight key regrets of the users are identified from the published literature and meta-analyses: complicated buy-sell process, lack of information, housing costs, house size, mortgage, agents, inspections and emotional decision-making. Nine key technologies can help address the REOP users’ needs and regrets. In terms of REOP users’ perception, 31 key factors have been identified, among which 19 are very important based on responses from 407 respondents. Graphical statistics, attractive design, immersive and novel content attract REOPs users, whereas tracing user location, learning tutorials and hyperlinks discourage them. Among possible relations between RSISTAM constructs, nine are categorised as two-way. There are 21 key barriers to adopting DDTs in the Australian real estate sector identified through a survey of 102 real estate managers. High costs, high complexity of systems and lack of government support, regulations and standards are the top reasons for non-adoption. This thesis addresses the users’ regrets and needs related to REOPs-based information through DDTs adoption and provides a novel framework for facilitating such adoption. The users’ perceptions, needs and regrets addressed through DDTs and the elimination of associated barriers can transform Australian real estate into the smart real estate sector.

  • (2021) Fizell, Megan
    Thesis
    This study addresses modern and contemporary food art practices that incorporate edible materials into art. Such art emerged in the early 20th century when artists began using edible materials in work designed to be touched, tasted, or smelled by audiences. By constructing these experiential encounters, food art activates bodily responses of a perceiving subject. My project proposes a theoretical framework called the 'gastronomic body' to address and analyse the subjective, bodily involvement of food art audiences where their bodies become perceptual sites for interpretation and introspection. I argue that social and cultural environments inform and direct audience perceptions of gustatory art. In this thesis, I build on existing food art literature by investigating how bodily memory links to culturally formed habits, dining rituals, and customs activated by food art. The experience of eating food, and by extension food art, is multidimensional: past experience can influence or shape a subject's perception. Referencing key examples of food art, I trace a lineage of art that employs edible materials from the Futurist banquets of the early 20th century to neo-avant-garde practices of the 1960s and 70s. Artists including Alison Knowles, Allan Kaprow, Dieter Roth, Edward Ruscha, and Daniel Spoerri used foodstuffs in various applications from object-based work to participatory, performance, and installation art. I also examine food-based artwork from the 1990s by Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Janine Antoni and more recent examples, including 21st-century edible installations by Elizabeth Willing and Sonja Alhauser. This examination of food art shows how the imagined dimensions of sensory experience in Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological theory of the 'virtual body' link sensory perception and encultured experience. I uncover how sociocultural customs and norms shape bodily responses and sensory feelings from pleasure to displeasure through the lens of Silvan S. Tomkins's psychological approach to affect theory. The gastronomic body bridges the sensory with the sociocultural to map the spectrum of sensations, memories, and gestures activated through the embodied experience of food art, connecting past and present, body and mind, self and others.

  • (2021) Yang, Hyungmo
    Thesis
    As increasing numbers of apartments are developed domestically and internationally, longstanding concerns about their livability for families with children become more pressing. This research explores how the quality and choice of apartment designs might be improved to better meet the needs of families with children. It focuses on unit layouts in Sydney, the city, which has the highest number of new apartment developments in Australia and a growing number and proportion of families with children. Unit layout is an important factor that influences residents’ desires and residential satisfaction, but there are few studies available on unit layout and residential desires. Firstly, the research investigated the units being developed in three areas (City of Sydney, City of Parramatta, and Liverpool City) through an analysis of sale information (unit plan, size, and price) before exploring the drivers behind current unit layouts through interviews with architects and developers. Secondly, the desires of families with children regarding unit layout were explored through interviews with parents living in apartments. The desires of parents were categorized as universal, consistent (according to children’s age), and diverse (according to personal tastes and cultural backgrounds). Thirdly, parents’ desires were compared with the unit layouts being delivered to identify synergies and mismatches and determine the aspects that need to be kept or need to be improved. Lastly, the implications of the research findings for designing and delivering units that better meet the desires of families with children are discussed. The research provides knowledge on the characteristics of delivered and desired unit layouts for families with children and contributes to academic research on the potential role the spatial layout of units has for improving residential satisfaction. The findings can assist governments in regulating apartment design and enable professionals in the building industry to better meet the desires of families with children. It also offers methodological innovation by combining different methods to measure spatial layout and compare this with abstract ideas about the desires of residents. While this thesis focused on the Sydney context and families with children, it provides insights into the impact and implications of apartment design for residents more broadly.

  • (2021) Zhang, Qian
    Thesis
    With the increases in general affluence and changes in societal expectations and environmental regulations, construction firms are under constant pressure to minimize their business operations on the environment while contributing to the growth of the communities and economy in which they operate. This leads to the ongoing discussion of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the construction industry. Hitherto, a considerable amount of research has documented the drivers, motivations, and barriers regarding the implementation of CSR in construction. However, it seems that little empirical work has been conducted to examine the key dimensions of CSR practices of Chinese construction firms and the collective effects of the key influencing factors on firms’ CSR implementation through the integrated lenses of stakeholders, institutional, and self-determination theories. In addressing this gap, this study aims to investigate the current state of CSR implementation of construction firms in China’s construction industry. With this aim, the specific objectives are to (i) develop and test a conceptual framework of CSR implementation in construction firms; (ii) identify the key dimensions of CSR implementation in construction firms; (iii) identify the key influencing factors of CSR implementation in construction firms; and (iv) examine the inter-relationships among those key influencing factors and their collective impacts on construction firms’ CSR implementation. A three-phase research process, based on a survey research design, was adopted for this study. Of these, the first phase involved a comprehensive review of the literature and an initial exploratory multiple-case study of the five leading Chinese construction firms’ CSR implementation. These help to contextualize, operationalize, and finetune the measurement items, characterizing CSR practices and their influencing factors, of the structured survey questionnaire. Thereafter, an industry-wide online questionnaire survey of 90 top management from the targeted top-tier Chinese construction firms was undertaken. The data collected was primarily analyzed using the exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) methods. The overall results reveal that CSR implementation by construction firms could be categorized along with eight key dimensions, namely: (i) shareholders’ interests; (ii) government commitment; (iii) CSR institutional arrangement; (iv) environmental preservation; (v) customers’ interests; (vi) employees’ interests; (vii) suppliers’ and partners’ interests; and (viii) well-being of local communities and the public. This finding reflects firms’ efforts to balance different key stakeholders’ conflicting interests to fulfill their diverse expectations and needs. It is found that these key dimensions of CSR implementation can be influenced, to a varying degree, by the different groups of external institutional and internal organizational factors. The results demonstrate the groups of key influencing factors include: (i) identified factors (i.e., the perceived importance of CSR practices); (ii) external institutional factors (i.e., coercive and normative factors, and mimetic factors); and (iii) intrinsic factors (i.e., strategic business direction, resource and capability, and organizational culture). In terms of the inter-relationships among the key influencing factors toward CSR implementation, the results indicate that the coercive and normative factors can largely contribute to contractors’ perceived importance of different dimensions of CSR practices (i.e., identified factors), while the latter can largely shape firms’ practical CSR implementation. Moreover, one of the most salient findings is that compared with the impacts of the intrinsic factors, identified factors and external institutional factors (especially coercive and normative factors) have greater significant positive impacts on most dimensions of firms’ CSR implementation. In conclusion, both external and internal factors collectively provide meaningful insights into the impacts of firms' CSR implementation. However, coercive and normative factors and identified factors are keys for construction firms to manage diverse stakeholders' expectations and needs, thereby implementing their social responsibility goals. This research informs the firm management of different configurations of considerations and strategies toward improving and building the required dimensions of CSR implementation.

  • (2021) Cheng, Yingjie
    Thesis
    The many untold stories of literary modernism spread across the globe and traverse a wide spectrum of subjects and disciplines. Literary modernism’s rhizomatic presence makes it almost impossible to draw a single line of development for this creative phenomenon. This thesis focuses on Antipodean women’s writings and their interventions into literary modernism. As former settler colonies of the Great Britain yet separated from it by the tyranny of distance, both Australia and New Zealand retain cultural lineage to the metropolitan centre while sharing a mixed and ambivalent attachment to it. A masculine tradition in the two countries’ literary cultures further impedes the emergence of women’s modernist writings. Antipodean women’s modernist writings attest to geographical and cultural contacts on a world scale and are complicated by both similarities and differences across the Tasman Sea. Through a manifold engagement in gender, cultural, postcolonial, transnational, and cosmopolitan critical discourses, this thesis highlights in particular the question of location inflected in Antipodean women’s modernist writings. Theoretically re-visiting and re-constructing the term “Antipodean Modernism,” it pivots on comparative readings of six Antipodean women writers. Katherine Mansfield and Christina Stead’s “Expatriate Modernism” demonstrates interactions between literary cultures across the north and the south. Their works set in Germany, France, and the Antipodean home countries complement and contest our imagination of what expatriation to Europe could offer to these literary women. Robin Hyde and Ethel Anderson’s literary careers stand for what this thesis proposes as “Modernism En Route.” Their encounters with stops between the Antipodean south and the Asian and metropolitan north generate a fourth dimensional imaginative and perceptual creative power. Eleanor Dark and Janet Frame display in their works a “Modernism in Place” which indicates the dynamics of their immediate Antipodean home. They imbue investigations of both local and global modernity and have an inward focus on human subjectivity. This thesis places Antipodean Modernism across the global sphere by means of looking into the factual and imaginative mobility of its women writers. It corroborates the simultaneous emergence of multiple modernisms outside its presumed hubs and promises Antipodean Modernism’s pivotal position in current discussions of literary modernism.