Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 54
  • (2010) Wagner, Nadia
    Thesis

  • (2011) Mataraga, Francesca Anna Rosewall
    Curatorial Output
    Installational painting exhibited in 'circle/square' at the Tin Sheds Gallery, Faculty of Architecture Design and Planning, The University of Sydney. Exhibition dates: 18 March - 2 April 2011.

  • (2011) Mataraga, Francesca Anna Rosewall
    Curatorial Output
    Exhibition Catalogue for circle/square at the Tin Sheds Gallery, Faculty of Architecture Design and Planning, The University of Sydney. Exhibition dates: 18 March - 2 April 2011.

  • (2010) Mataraga, Francesca
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    Exhibited as part of Constructed Painting (Melbourne) at Level 17 Artspace, Victoria University, 300 Flinders St, Melbourne. April 20-May 7, 2010. Artists in this exhibition: Nicole Ellis, Liz Shreeve, Rossana Martinez, Margaret Roberts, Francesca Mataraga.

  • (2010) Mataraga, Francesca
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    Exhibition at Kudos Gallery, 6 Napier St, Paddington.

  • (2011) Jones, Mark Ian
    Thesis
    This thesis focusses on English language discourse on Swedish and Scandinavian Design during the 1950s and the reception and profile of the Swedish glass artist, Vicke Lindstrand. The principal aim is to reconstruct the context in which narratives and rhetoric emerged and to analyse its effect on Lindstrand, between 1950-1970. Swedish and Scandinavian design are described in terms of a pared-down, clichéd aesthetic associated with 1950s ‘Scandinavian Design’, now held as a ‘construct’, continuously emphasising the same preeminent exemplars. Informed by extensive field study in Sweden, detailed archival research, informant interviews, object and text analysis, I examine this ‘construct’ in two parts. Firstly, I investigate the disproportional impact of a small actor-network associated with twentieth century English language discourse on Swedish and Scandinavian design. I argue that this demonstrates the pervasive influence of the construction of a national ideal (Swedish design) that was loosely translated to fit a regional ideal (Scandinavian Design) by the formation of an exclusive filter that determined the fit of what was included in the promotion of a cohesive identity. This filter emphasised an ideology that shaped perceptions and has influenced the subsequent reception and visibility of individual designers. Not all designers were treated equally. Nationalist, regionalist and internationalist influences had an impact upon the critical reception of their work further complicated by past associations. The actor-network operated at the level of what I term selective solidarity, which was exclusive rather than inclusive. Secondly, I examine the consequences of this fit through an analysis of the position and reception of Lindstrand. Preeminent exemplars, familial influences and the agency of an actor-network were profoundly influential in shaping perceptions and determining taste in 1950s Sweden, presenting a filtered view of design from the region. Lindstrand was strongly affected by the activities of this network. An interesting outcome of this study was the realisation that our understanding of Swedish design is incomplete, and that there is another more pluralist aesthetic concealed behind that officially promoted and exhibited during the 1950s. This investigation brings unique and unprecedented readings of a peripheral individual in the context of English language representation, and of the Scandinavian milieu.

  • (2011) Millson, Sue
    Thesis
    The subject of this research is sport. The role of the spectator is central to this research. Spectator as Spectacle is an investigation and response into a particular area of contemporary culture, the sporting crowd. The enormous numbers of individuals who participate in this leisure activity justify sport as being a dominant part of Australian life and validate its analyRelevant theories from disciplines including phenomenology and social and cultural anthropology provide a relevant framework for discussion. Diverse influences are examined including artists and photographers who have concerns, concepts and techniques with correlations to the evolution of the research paintings. The body of work produced articulates and reveals the sharing of space, immersive aspects, anonymity and personal assertion. Whether magnified to a cropped close up of an individual or viewed from a distance as a crowd, each painting reveals aspects of the spectator experience. The resulting paintings are primarily realistic, based on personal digital photographs taken at a multitude of sporting events at a variety of stadium locations. However, actual events and sites are unimportant to this investigation and are unidentifiable in the work, since it is the commonality of experience, rather than the differences that is the crux of the study. The scale is deliberately small, the antithesis of the vast environments where the action takes place. The viewer is encouraged toward the picture, yet distanced by the images being softly blurred. The manipulation of focus controls the amount of information revealed in the image and unites elements of the picture. Image selection, cropping, enlarging and computer manipulation each plays a part in the paintings. By shifting attention from the on-field play to the stands, spectators are exposed and revealed as deserving the consideration usually reserved for competitors. The result elevates spectators from the support act to the spectacle.

  • (2011) Whalen, Jodie
    Thesis
    I m Worth My Weight In Gold is the examination of gendered social conditioning from the female perspective, addressing ideas of beauty, body image and how these in turn create notions of self and identity within a contemporary Western context. During the last decade of the twentieth century, issues of personal identity and self-image and how identity is constructed, came to the forefront of cultural commentary. I m Worth My Weight In Gold explores not only this concept in relation to the individual and the realm of beauty but looks at the ways in which artists construct or re construct their biographies to ask questions about social conditioning and limitations.

  • (2010) nova Milne, Stephanie and Richard
    Thesis
    This research document forms the conjecture for a working process we have collectively developed and executed in a number of Ms&Mr works since 2007. Retroactive Collaboration is defined as the event of reworking found material belonging to a subject’s former self in the pursuit of transforming and transgressing the personal archive. We connect the imagined possibilities of Time Dilation, the phenomena described by Einstein’s relativity, with the collapse of past, present and future biographical material to form alternate relational scenarios.

  • (2010) Naylor, Jane
    Thesis
    A personal and growing dissatisfaction with the role and function of art and the art world in the last ten years in particular led me to ask how an artist might find ways to relocate shared values so as to reorder the debris of the fragmenting effects of capitalism. Initially I investigated the many alternative modes of art practice which lay outside the institutional structures dedicated to conventional modes of exhibiting. Consequently, I traced the Fluxus attitude back to Dada and forwards through Conceptual Art to focus on a re-blossoming in diverse contemporary ‘microtopian’ art practices which I call ‘Independent *Rt Tactics’. By analysing the strategies of 'pataphysics, Fluxus, and subsequent forms such as Mail Art and zines, I generated a set of categories to identify and describe Independent *Rt Tactics. These categories are pasquinade, sousveillance, boycotten, ludic, karnivale and xenia. Independent *Rt Tactics are, in general, characterised by their location outside galleries, their aim is to connect to community and their intention to offer social criticism, particularly of spectatorship in all its guises. As a result of this research and concerns with the dimensions of my own practice, I have created ‘SnackArt’ - a vending machine which is both an exhibition space and a means of selling low calorie, high intellect artwork by a range of artists, and ‘The Ekphrastic Agency’ - a free, mobile art customisation service, which demonstrates my movement away from the production of more ‘stuff’. These *Rt tactics reflect a type of ‘art strike’, best described as an ‘art diet’ which provides a criticism of the indiscriminate application of the appellation ‘art’ and creates awareness of the consumption and production of junk art calories.