Arts Design & Architecture

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 696
  • (2007) Misawa, Fumiko; Hirota, Kiko
    Conference Paper
    This paper discusses a new approach to an education program about timber architecture for a sustainable future and rehabilitation in relation to the forestry industry, the community as well as architectural education. Due to global concerns of environmental sustainability, forestry and timber architecture have been chosen as key building environments. However, in Japan, there is a knowledge gap in the education program for more than 30 years relating to a specific aspect of timber architecture. In 1995, design problems of modern Japanese timber architecture were revealed in the aftermath of the Hanshin Awaji Great earthquake. Gifu Academy of Forest Science and Culture decided to adopt a new type of timber architecture curriculum for “Learning with Forests”, consisting of three major projects. They are: 1) self-build project, 2) local project and 3) intensive design studio project. In these projects, four major characteristics of timber architecture were selected as core educational focuses, in addition to community partnership and local culture. They are: structure, materials, space and function. This methodology has already been applied to local projects in Japan and the collaboration design studio with The University of New South Wales (UNSW). This paper highlights the final project of this intensive design studio and documents the outcome of this novel approach to modern timber architecture program in terms of environmental, social and cultural sustainability.

  • (2007) Bernabei, Rina; Walsh, Christopher
    Conference Paper
    This paper describes a collaborative introductory design studio experience, designed and coordinated by staff from the Faculty of the Built Environment- University of NSW. The aim of the one day event was to introduce students from diverse programs such as Landscape Architecture and Industrial Design to each other, design as a whole, the local environment and the importance of human interaction. The students understanding of design was enriched through a selection of short wide-ranging workshops. The work undertaken in this event was later used in the normal studio, and exhibited to their peers in a group exhibition. In addition to describing the event and its outcomes, this paper aims to capture students reflections.

  • (2007) Trouton, Lycia Danielle
    Journal Article
    This brief article explains the non-hierarchical listing of all 'Troubles' deaths in the inclusive Irish Linen Memorial (renamed The Linen Memorial in 2007) - killings for which various persons/groups on either side of the political divide, as well as the security forces, were responsible. The artwork-memorial can be read as an anti-monument. The Linen Memorial (hereafter LM) acts as a 'modest witness' in reordering relationships and engaging a parity of esteem between Nationalist/Republican ('Catholic') and Loyalist/Unionist ('Protestant') communities during the post-1998 period when Northern Ireland is emerging from conflict. The use of the linen handkerchief as symbolic for heartfelt grief was what inspired me to use it, as a building block, to create a non-traditional and mobile memorial to those killed in the sectarian violence, commonly called The Troubles, in Northern Ireland.

  • (2007) Baldry, Eileen; Armstrong, Karen; Chartrand, Vicki
    Journal Article
    It is documented that imprisonment rates of women have been increasing rapidly, both worldwide and in Australia, over the past decade. Discrimination against women may help to account for their increased numbers in the criminal justice system, but is also a concern in its own right. Looking at the context of New South Wales, we explore how women are subject to direct and indirect discrimination based on sex, race and disability in the police, court and prison systems. Changes in legislation and practices within the system over the past two decades have impacted negatively upon particular groups of people, especially upon poor and racialised women and women with mental or cognitive health concerns. Further to this, practices such as strip searching have a pernicious effect on women in custody. These developments, along with other practices imposed upon women in the criminal justice system, are argued to constitute systemic discrimination.

  • (2006) Baldry, Eileen; Green, Susan; Thorpe, Katrina
    Journal Article
    Urban Aboriginal communities were asked about their experiences of human services. The misuse of Aboriginal liaison staff, the attitudes of staff and policy-makers, the invisibility of Aboriginal clients, poor communication, lack of access to services, client rights and lack of integration were raised. Respect for Aboriginal persons' social citizenship is discussed.

  • (2008) Baldry, Eileen
    Journal Article
    The number and rate of people imprisoned in Australia has risen rapidly over the past two decades. The largest rates of increase have been in remand, women and Indigenous prisoners. There has been a concomitant rise in the rate and number of prisoners being released back to the community. Many thousands of these releasees are back in prison within two years: on the prison conveyor belt cycling in and out. The majority of prisoners are from severely disadvantaged backgrounds, with serious health problems. Those with mental and cognitive disability and a history of abuse are grossly over-represented amongst the prison population as are Indigenous Australians. The prison is tasked with a number of purposes: punitive, deterrent, protective and rehabilitative. But the legitimacy and indeed the viability of these purposes for the majority of those in prison and for the wider citizenry in the context of increasing imprisonment in Australia is challenged using social justice and community well-being analyses.

  • (2008) Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Ng, Judy; Chan, Raymond; Bunker, Jeremy; Zwar, N
    Journal Article
    Objective: In 2002, New South Wales (NSW) Health introduced an updated policy for occupational screening and vaccination against infectious diseases. This study describes healthcare worker (HCW) immunity to hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and varicella based on serological screening, following introduction of this policy. Methods: HCW screening serology performed at two healthcare facilities in south western Sydney (Bankstown and Fairfield) was extracted for the period September 2003 to September 2005. Immunity to hepatitis B, MMR and varicella was quantitated and cross-tabulated against age, sex and staff risk category. Results: A total of 1,320 HCWs were screened. Almost two thirds were immune to hepatitis B while immunity to MMR and varicella ranged from 88% to 94%. Age stratification showed lower levels of measles immunity in those born after 1965. Conclusions: Despite availability of vaccination for over two decades, a significant proportion of HCWs at these two facilities were non-immune to hepatitis B. This is of concern for those non-immune staff involved in direct clinical care, who are at risk of blood and body fluid exposures. The small group of HCWs non-immune to MMR and varicella pose a risk to themselves and others in the event of an outbreak. Implications: There is a need for improved implementation of the occupational screening and vaccination policy, including better education of HCWs about the risks of non-immunity to vaccine preventable diseases. The revised 2007 NSW Health policy may assist this process and will need evaluation to determine whether HCW immunity improves in the coming years.

  • (2006) Craig, Lyn
    Journal Article
    Women are increasingly allocating time to the paid workforce, but there hasnot been a corresponding change by men allocating equivalent time to domestic and caring labour. In the absence of sufficient institutional and domestic support, women continue to supply the bulk of time required to care for children. This amounts to only half a sex revolution and raises the question of whether becoming a parent creates welfare differences between mothers and fathers, and/or between mothers and non-mothers. This article addresses this issue by analysing data from the most recent Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) Time Use Survey to investigate the impact of children on adults’ (paid and unpaid) workload. The results show that the time impact of becoming a parent is considerable, but very unevenly distributed by sex. Having children markedly intensifies gender inequities in time allocation by increasing specialization and women’s workload.

  • (2006) Craig, Lyn
    Journal Article
    This article uses diary data from the most recent Australian Bureau of Statistics Time Use Survey (N > 4,000) to compare by gender total child care time calculated in the measurements of (1) main activity, (2) main or secondary activity, and (3) total time spent in the company of children. It also offers an innovative gender comparison of relative time spent in (1) the activities that constitute child care, (2) child care as double activity, and (3) time with children in sole charge. These measures give a fuller picture of total time commitment to children and how men and women spend that time than has been available in previous time use analyses. The results indicate that compared to fathering, mothering involves not only more overall time commitment but more multitasking, more physical labor, a more rigid timetable, more time alone with children, and more overall responsibility for managing care. These gender differences in the quantity and nature of care apply even when women work full-time.

  • (2006) Craig, Lyn
    Journal Article
    How does parental education affect time in the paid workforce and time with children? Potentially, the effects are contradictory.An economic perspective suggests higher education means a pull to the market. Human capital theory predicts that, because higher education improves earning capacity, educated women face higher opportunity costs if they forego wages, so will allocate more time to market work and less to unpaid domestic labour. But education may also exercise a pull to the home. Attitudes to child rearing are subject to strong social norms, and parents with higher levels of education may be particularly receptive to the current social ideal of attentive, sustained and intensive nurturing. Using data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics Time-use Survey 1997, this study offers a snapshot of how these contradictory pulls play out in daily life. It finds that inAustralia, households with university-educated parents spend more daily time with children than other households in physical care and in developmental activities. Sex inequality in care time persists, but fathers with university education do contribute more time to care of children, including time alone with them, than other fathers. Mothers with university education allocate more daily time than other mothers to both childcare and to paid work.