UNSW Canberra

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
  • (2006) Gwinner, G; Gomez, E; Orozco, L; Galvan, A; Sheng, D; Zhao, Yunjie; Sprouse, G; Behr, J; Jackson, K; Pearson, Mark; Aubin, S; Flambaum, Victor
    Journal Article

  • (2002) Flambaum, Victor; Stewart, Glen; Russell, Graeme; Horvat, J.; Dou, S.
    Journal Article

  • (2003) Burgess, Marion; Wolfe, Joseph
    Journal Article

  • (2001) Hall, Peter; Penev, Spiridon
    Journal Article
    We show that unless the target density is particularly smooth, cross-validation applied directly to nonlinear wavelet estimators produces an empirical value of primary resolution which fails, by an order of magnitude, to give asymptotic optimality. We note, too, that in the same setting, but for different reasons, cross-validation of the linear component of a wavelet estimator fails to give asymptotic optimality, if the primary resolution level that it suggests is applied to the nonlinear form of the estimator. We propose an alternative technique, based on multiple cross-validation of the linear component. Our method involves dividing the region of interest into a number of subregions, choosing a resolution level by cross-validation of the linear part of the estimator in each subregion, and taking the final empirically chosen level to be the minimum of the subregion values. This approach exploits the relative resistance of wavelet methods to over-smoothing: the final resolution level is too small in some parts of the main region, but that has a relatively minor effect on performance of the final estimator. The fact that we use the same resolution level throughout the region, rather than a different level in each subregion, means that we do not need to splice together different estimates and remove artificial jumps where the subregions abut.

  • (2006) Zhang, Fei; Macnicol, James; Pickering, Mark; Frater, Michael; Arnold, John
    Journal Article
    We investigate streaming video over Differentiated Services (Diffserv) networks that can provide a number of aggregated traffic classes with increasing quality guarantee. We propose a method to measure the loss impact of a video packet on the quality of the decoded video images. We show how the optimal Quality-of-Service (QoS) mapping from the video packets into a set of traffic classes depends on the loss rates of the classes and the pricing model, and we develop an algorithm to accurately find the optimal QoS mapping. The performance of our algorithm is evaluated through computer simulations and compares favorably to an existing algorithm.

  • (2007) Freyens, Benoit; Oslington, Paul
    Journal Article
    The influence of labor market regulation on employment and other macroeconomic variables is intensely debated across the OECD. In Australia the focus is currently on the employment impact of proposed changes to unfair dismissal provisions. There is surprisingly little research on the magnitude and structure of dismissal costs and this paper presents new data from a major survey of small- and medium-sized Australian enterprises. Dismissal costs are compared for different types of separations, including redundancy, uncontested fires and complex fires. Using the data, we estimate the employment impact of the proposed unfair dismissal changes, which we find likely to be modest.

  • (2005) Oslington, Paul
    Journal Article
    Changes in the military environment and wider society are making increasingly complex ethical demands on Australian Defence Force officers, and this article describes recent developments in ethics education at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

  • (2005) Oslington, Paul
    Journal Article
    In contrast to the focus of the public debate over trade liberalisation on job losses there is a widespread view among economists that unemployment and trade issues should be considered separately. This view cannot be justified theoretically, and ignores the growing number of general equilibrium trade models with unemployment. In a simple model with an exogenous wage floor, trade liberalisation can lead to either gains or losses depending on the production technology, severity of the factor market distortion, factor intensities of the industries, and conditions in trading partners. Definite results can be derived about gains from liberalising trade with lower wage floors, about relative abundance of the unemployed factor dampening losses when trade is liberalised, and about gains when the good which uses the unemployed factor is exported. The theoretical models are then linked to the policy modelling literature, using the example of recent Australian controversies over liberalisation of trade in automobiles and textiles. It is argued that trade liberalisation would be better advanced by including endogenous employment in trade policy simulation exercises and by discussing employment effects rather than brushing them aside as temporary adjustment problems or regional difficulties.

  • (2005) Oslington, Paul
    Journal Article
    A major problem with on-line education in contemporary universities is securing cooperation of teaching staff. This paper argues that even if the benefits of on-line learning are widely recognised, several incentive problems inhibit academic staff participation. These incentive problems include unverifiability of expertise in on-line learning, the firm-specific nature of investments in on-line learning and the team nature of on-line learning. Suggestions are made for remedying each of these problems by correcting the distorted incentives faced by academics and administrators alike.

  • (2006) Ranasinghe, Roshanka; Turner, Ian; Symonds, Graham
    Journal Article
    The results of a series of 2DH numerical and 3D scaled physical modelling tests indicate that processes governing shoreline response to submerged structures, such as artificial surfing reefs, are different from those associated with emergent offshore breakwaters. Unlike the case of emergent offshore breakwaters, where shoreline accretion (salient development) is expected under all structural/environmental conditions, the principal mode of shoreline response to submerged structures can vary between erosive and accretive, depending on the offshore distance to the structure. The predominant wave incidence angle and structure crest level also have important implications on the magnitude of shoreline response, but not on the mode of shoreline response (i.e. erosion vs. accretion). Based on the results obtained here, a predictive empirical relationship is proposed as a preliminary engineering tool to assess shoreline response to submerged structures. Crown Copyright (C) 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.