Other UNSW

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Now showing 1 - 10 of 22
  • (2011) Gray, Richard; Byrne, Kate
    Conference Paper
    While the mobile environment has made it possible for academic content to be accessed at the point of need, this paper ponders what value scholars place on the content available via the mobile web. Through an in-depth, qualitative survey of academics from the University of New South Wales Faculty of Law, Faculty of Arts and Social Science and the University’s Australian School of Business this paper aims to understand how academics are currently engaging with e-content in both teaching and research and how this has been altered by the mobile environment. The potential benefits and pitfalls for academic use of mobile content, the adaptations in information seeking behaviour necessary for academics to meet the changing technological demands, and the implications for collection development and content delivery in academic libraries is discussed.

  • (2012) Park, Miles
    Conference Paper
    For designers, a key consideration to improve the environmental performance of new products and services is energy and resource efficiency (eco-efficiency). This is particularly important for household energy using products (EuPs) as they consume significant energy during the consumption (use) phase of their lifecycle. EuPs incorporate many types of consumer electrical and electronic products, including televisions and computers as well as the many other powered kitchen, laundry, bathroom and personal electronic devices of which ownership, both individually and cumulatively has increased dramatically in modern households. A consequence of EuP ownership and changing behavioural patterns is that EuPs cumulative contribution to overall household energy use is increasing in Australia, at 4.7% per annum. This is despite the sustained efforts over many years to improve energy efficiency of individual EuPs that is claimed to have improved at a rate of 2% per annum since 1970. This begs exploration of the drivers underpinning this divergence between predicted energy conservation through efficiency and actual energy use. The aim of this study is to investigate why household energy use from EuPs continues to rise. Such situations are described as ‘rebound effects’ where ‘designed in’ energy savings are not achieved. Exploring the proposition of the rebound effect, this study investigates design, ownership and use parameters of televisions (and peripheral equipment), washing machines, dishwashers and refrigerators benchmarked over a period of time. Drawing upon a variety of technical and behavioural criteria, data is mapped and presented for analysis to locate, identify and remark upon the qualities and significance of a likely rebound effect. Such information, where identified, highlights the hidden implications and significance of product use and user behaviour in shaping the success, or otherwise, of design strategies to conserve energy and consumption.

  • (2012) Blackmore, Margaret; Freeland, Pam
    Conference Paper

  • (2011) Fletcher, Janet
    Conference Paper
    When entering an academic library, customers most often see a service desk. Some libraries have one desk and other libraries have multiple service points. At the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Library there is none. The rationale behind a no desk academic library is: to create a more user friendly environment where library staff approach and greet customers rather than the other way around exploit self-service technologies by providing self-service check outs, computer terminals and shopping centre-style kiosks ensure that the Library s prime real estate is used even when library staff are not present .After extensive renovations the Library has become an exemplar for customer space, providing flexible facilities and services that positively respond to the needs of today s (and future) customers. The Help Zone is designed to be a place where customers seek assistance with staff taking a customer to a workstation/self-check machine/kiosk to undertake an activity. At the Help Zone customers are encouraged to find out answers for themselves with staff members acting as guides rather than the experts. This paper outlines the design features and service model of UNSW Library s Help Zone. It provides details on changes to staffing work and structure, responses from customers, designing the shopping centre-style kiosks, and the intended rollout plan to other (non library) service areas of the University.

  • (2011) Bailin, Kylie; Croucher, Joanne L.
    Conference Paper
    In this BoF [Birds of a Feather Discussion Session] we seek engagement with researchers and eResearch professionals to explore different approaches to having conversations about research data access and reuse. Rather than typifying open data as an all-or-nothing dichotomy, the discussion will be framed around the idea of a continuum of openness. Key areas to be explored include research communities expectations of reciprocity, and the changing expectations of funding agencies and publishers. Another topic for discussion is the current and future roles for libraries, data librarians and eResearch intermediaries in research data management. One of the biggest hurdles in beginning the eResearch discussion with researchers is explaining about this spectrum of open data and quelling fears that all data will have to be completely open. This discussion will look at the complexities involved with supporting researchers and informing them about all the different levels of openness. This BoF will also look at education and training as it relates to open data and building capabilities among both support professionals and researchers.

  • (2012) Bailin, Kylie; O'Dwyer, Shaun
    Conference Paper
    Imagine walking into an academic library and finding no service desk and no queues. There are friendly staff who greet you and ask you if you need assistance. You are then directed to a self-service check out, a workstation or to a consultation room. This is the new reality at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Library. This paper outlines the planning, design features and service model of UNSW Library’s Help Zone, including the imaginative use of space, details on changes to staffing work and structure and responses from customers and library staff who work in the Help Zone.

  • (2012) Neil, Alison J.
    Conference Paper
    The size and usage of eBook collections are increasing in academic libraries. Incorporating these materials into library collections will require efficient and standardised workflows. Although there might be small interruptions and problems when acquiring print items and online serials, most libraries have established workflows to select what is required and to provide access in a quick and efficient manner. This paper will outline the journey University of New South Wales Library experienced in acquiring eBooks, and the mechanisms needed to develop an efficient selection and acquisition workflow for eBooks.

  • (2010) Frances, Maude; Riccardi, Stefania; Carlsen, Carmel; Dawson, Angela
    Conference Paper
    The paper describes and demonstrates the use of Primo as the discovery layer for a Fedora repository. Primo is an Ex Libris product designed to be a one-stop solution for discovery and delivery of resources from various sources. Fedora/Primo systems have been deployed on two UNSW eResearch projects, based on requirements of research groups in public health and social sciences. Planning has commenced for implementation of Primo on existing Fedora/VITAL systems, including MemRE (Membranes Research Environment). With the general release of Primo 3 in April 2010, VITAL will be replaced as the search and discovery layer of the institutional repository also. The presentation demonstrates KnowlHEG, an electronic gateway for Human Resources for Health (HRH) material relating to Asia and the Pacific region, which was jointly developed by the University Library and the School of Public Health and Community Medicine (SPHCM) at UNSW. Primo provides the user interface, search functionality and persistent URLs on a Fedora repository. The paper describes and demonstrates the use of Primo as the discovery layer for a Fedora repository. Primo is an Ex Libris product designed to be a one-stop solution for discovery and delivery of resources from various sources. Primo gathers and normalises records from multiple systems. A ‘pipe’ is configured for each data source.

  • (2011) Sidhunata, Harry R.; Croucher, Joanne L.; Frances, Maude
    Conference Paper
    The Selective Harvester supports scholarly communication and eResearch by providing a flexible and customisable mechanism to select and re-use metadata records from open access repositories. This workflow can assist subject-based repositories in the selection and addition of relevant content. The open-source Selective Harvester developed at the University Library, University of New South Wales (UNSW) integrates an existing OAI-PMH harvester and provider tool (jOAI) with a custom built Java-based application. The Selective Harvester has been implemented on the NCHSR Clearinghouse, a subject-based repository developed jointly by UNSW Library and researchers at the National Centre in HIV Social Research (NCHSR) and on Membrane Research Environment (MemRE), a component infrastructure project of the Advanced Membrane Technologies for Water Treatment Research Cluster funded by the CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship.

  • (2011) Frances, Maude; Fletcher, Janet; Harmer, Sue
    Conference Paper
    The paper outlines the strategies and processes that were adopted by the Library at the University of New South Wales, a research intensive university in Australia, to provide eResearch support services for the University’s academic community. The focus of the paper is on how structural, technical, staff and content-related components of the Library were reshaped to integrate eResearch services with the organisation’s existing business. Relationships between Library work units were reconfigured and new collaborations with researchers and external partners were developed. The authors conclude that organisational flexibility is a core requirement for academic libraries to be responsive to changing research practice and developments in scholarly communication.