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  • (2013) Williams, Alishia; Lau, Gloria; Grisham, Jessica
    Journal Article
    Background and Objectives: Thought-action fusion (TAF), or maladaptive cognitions regarding the relationship between mental events and behaviours, has been implicated in the development and maintenance of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). As some religions promote TAF-like appraisals, it has been proposed that religiosity may play a role in the transformation of normally occurring intrusive thoughts into clinically distressing obsessions. No research, however, has experimentally investigated the mediating role of TAF on the relationship between religiosity and OC symptoms. Methods: 85 Christian, Jewish, and Atheist/Agnostic participants were exposed to an experimental thought-induction protocol and reported on their associated levels of distress, guilt, feelings of responsibility, and urge to suppress target intrusions experienced during a 5-minute monitoring period. Participants also completed measures of obsessive-compulsive symptomatology, TAF beliefs, and general psychopathology. Results: Using PROCESS and bootstrapping analyses, a test of the conditional indirect effects of religiosity on obsessive-compulsive symptoms revealed that Christianity moderated the effects of religiosity on moral TAF beliefs, which in turn mediated the relationship between religiosity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Furthermore, in the Christian group, moral TAF beliefs mediated the relationship between religiosity and ratings of guilt and responsibility following the experimental protocol. Limitations: The use of university students with moderate levels of religiosity. Conclusions: Collectively the results suggest that obsessional thinking is not attributable to religion per se, but that teachings underlying certain religious doctrines may fuel TAF beliefs that are implicated in the maintenance of OCD.

  • (2005) Cranney, Jacquelyn; Kofod, Michelle; Huon, Gail; Jensen, Lene; Levin, Kirsty; McAlpine, Iain; Whitaker, Noel
    Conference Paper

  • (2020) Rowlands, Benjamin
    Thesis
    Sirtuins (SIRTs) comprise a family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylases, capable of affecting health-span and DNA expression. In cell-culture and peripheral-tissue models, researchers have identified that SIRT1 and SIRT2 are also capable of changing enzymatic activity in glycolysis and Krebs cycle. In brain, the impact of SIRT1 and SIRT2 deacetylase activity on metabolism is poorly understood. The aim of this project was to determine if metabolic pathways in brain could be regulated by SIRT1 and SIRT2-mediated deacetylation in mammalian systems. An established ex vivo reductionist model of brain metabolism was used to test the hypothesis that direct inhibition, activation or ablation of SIRT1 or SIRT2 deacetylase activity would result in significant changes in brain metabolism. Alterations in brain metabolism were assessed by examining changes in 13C-enriched substrates, and metabolite pools with 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Chapter three provides evidence that approximately 30% of the GABA synthesized from [1,2-13C]acetate was made directly in neurons. Activation of neuronal specific SIRT1 caused an increase in the incorporation of [1,2-13C]acetate into brain, while activation of astrocytes with potassium depolarization caused a decrease in [1,2-13C]acetate incorporation. These results indicate that acetate is not a reliable marker, nor exclusively metabolised in astrocytes. Further, brain metabolism of acetate is modulated through enzyme acetylation regulated by SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Results in chapter four posit that activation of SIRT1 with SRT 1720 directly stimulated incorporation of 13C into Krebs cycle intermediates and reduced incorporation into lactate. Several off-target effects were observed for SIRT1 activator resveratrol and SIRT1 inhibitory EX-527 that questions their suitability for study of SIRT1 activity. Chapter five concludes that inhibition of SIRT deacetylase activity by AGK2 produced an effect consistent with glutamatergic AMPA receptor activation, in keeping with known SIRT2 targets. Potent SIRT2 inhibitor C64 increased 13C label incorporation into GABA from [1-13C]D-glucose in guinea pigs, and glutamine from [1,2-13C]acetate in WT mice, an effect that was also observed in SIRT2 KO mice. These results indicate that SIRT2 deacetylase activity may impact neurotransmitter systems. This thesis supports the theory that SIRT1 and SIRT2 deacetylase activity can influence brain metabolism in mammalian systems.