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  • (2014) Newman, Christy; de Wit, John; Crooks, Levinia; Reynolds, Robert; Canavan, Peter; Kidd, Michael
    Journal Article
    As the management of HIV changes and demand for HIV health services in primary care settings increases, new approaches to engaging the general practice workforce with HIV medicine are required. This paper reports on qualitative research conducted with 47 clinicians who provide HIV care in general practice settings around Australia, including accredited HIV s100 prescribers as well as other GPs and general practice nurses. Balanced numbers of men and women took part; less than a quarter were based outside of urban metropolitan settings. The most significant workforce challenges that participants said they faced in providing HIV care in general practice were keeping up with knowledge, navigating low caseload and regional issues, balancing quality care with cost factors, and addressing the persistent social stigma associated with HIV. Strategic responses developed by participants to address these challenges included thinking more creatively about business and caseload planning, pursuing opportunities to share care with specialist clinicians, and challenging prejudiced attitudes amongst patients and colleagues. Understanding and supporting the needs of the general practice workforce in both high and low HIV caseload settings will be essential in ensuring Australia has the capacity to respond to emerging priorities in HIV prevention and care.

  • (2014) Mills, Katherine; Ewer, Phillipa; Dore, Glenys; Teesson, Maree; Baker, Amanda; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Sannibale, Claudia
    Journal Article
    Background: Traumaexposure and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common among clients of substance use services. Existing treatments for these co-occurring conditions tend to be lengthy, treatment retention is relatively poor, and they require extensive training and clinical supervision. The aim of the present study was to conduct a preliminary examination of the feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention for PTSD symptoms among individuals seeking substance use treatment. Methods: An uncontrolled open-label pilot study was conducted among 29 inpatients of a medicated detoxification unit in Sydney, Australia. All participants completed a baseline interview followed by the brief intervention. The intervention consists of a single, one-hourmanualised session providing psychoeducation pertaining to common trauma reactions and symptom management. PTSD and substance use outcomes were assessed at 1-week, 1-month and 3-month post-intervention. Results: PTSD symptom severity (assessed using the Clinicians Administered PTSD Scale) decreased significantly from baseline to 1-week follow up (β −10.87, 95%CI: −19.75 to −1.99) and again between the 1-week and 3-month follow-ups (β −15.38, 95%CI: −23.20 to −7.57). Despite these reductions, the majority of participants continued to meet criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD and there was no change in participants' negative post-traumatic cognitions. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. Conclusions: Brief psychoeducation for traumatised clients attending substance use services appears to be feasible, acceptable, and may be of some benefit in reducing PTSD symptoms. However, participants continued to experience symptoms at severe levels; thus, brief intervention may best be conceptualised as a “stepping stone†to further trauma treatment.