Engineering

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 83
  • (1995) Helmore, Phillip
    Conference Paper
    Many methods for predicting the resistance of various types of marine craft are now available in the literature. Some methods are more reliable than others, and knowing which are the best can be important. At UNSW we have begun a long-term program of implementing the various methods for student use, and evaluating them by comparisons with available data. The prediction methods cover displacement, pre-planing and planing hulls, and catamarans. This paper looks at some of the methods which have been programmed and some which have not, their limitations, and some experiences of the use of those which have been programmed. The opportunity is also taken to correct typographical errata in some of the original papers which otherwise limits the use of the methods.

  • (1995) Mubaraki, Brian; Bandyopadhyay, Srikanta; Fowle, R; Mathew, Philip; Heath, P
    Journal Article

  • (1998) Helmore, Phillip
    Journal Article
    A recent publication says that the primary spelling of the word for the depth of water required to float a ship is draught, with draft as the secondary spelling. A survey of thirty practising naval architects was made to check the claim, and found that a large majority of Australian-educated naval architects spell it draft. The overall results are interesting and are given here.

  • (1998) Helmore, Phillip
    Journal Article
    The two types of marine hydrometer commonly used by naval architects and surveyors measure two distinct, but related, properties. The properties have different units and are used for different purposes. Some users may not be aware of the two types of hydrometer, the properties measured, or the errors which can significantly affect the end result. The relationships between the measured properties are discussed, together with the specific applications of the two types of hydrometer. The conversion of measurements made on one type of hydrometer to the other type is given, with examples of the conversions. Application of the principles presented here will prevent confusion and ensure the use, rather than abuse, of the two types of marine hydrometer.

  • (1999) Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Byrne, Kerry
    Conference Paper
    Pipe laggings are used as a means of inhibiting the transmission of sound radiated from pipes. They are usually formed of porous jackets such as fibreglass or rockwool blankets and impervious jackets such as cladding sheets. Sometimes air spaces are used to separate these jackets from the pipe and each other. Papers in the readily available literature relating to the acoustic performance of pipe laggings are generally concerned with presenting experimental results such as frequency dependent insertion losses. The authors have developed a model to calculate the insertion losses produced by such laggings when the lagged pipes are vibrating in their low order structural modes. The results of the model indicate that negative insertion lossess are not unexpected with conventional pipe laggings, particularly at low frequencies.

  • (1995) Mubaraki, Brian; Bandyopadhyay, Srikanta; Fowle, R; Mathew, Philip; Heath, P
    Journal Article


  • (1997) Zhang, Husong
    Thesis