Engineering

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 13
  • (2002) Magin, Douglas; Helmore, Phillip
    Conference Paper
    Despite numerous studies on the reliability of peer marking of oral presentation skills, no empirical studies to date have addressed the validity issue of whether students use a different 'perspective' from teachers in making an overall assessment. This paper analyses peer and teacher assessment data from thesis presentations made by students enrolled in a fourth year subject 'Communications for Professional Engineers'. The study uses a novel application of the 'index of association' statistic to determine the extent to which the variance of marks by teachers and by peers for the overall quality of the presentations can be attributed to factors other than errors associated with unreliable measures. Results indicate that students had applied criteria which were quite different from those used by teachers. The discussion describes methodologies which can be employed to determine which skill criteria are most influential in the determination of a global mark for oral presentations, and outlines plans to identify the ways in which students and staff differ in the criteria they apply.

  • (2001) Magin, Douglas; Helmore, Phillip
    Conference Paper
    Recent reviews on assessment in higher education have emphasised the importance of written formative assessment as part of the process of assessing oral presentation skills, and have identified the need for case studies to investigate the content and character of feedback which students receive. The paper analyses the written feedback provided by teachers who acted as assessors for conference presentations made by engineering students enrolled in a fourth year subject at The University of New South Wales. The study employs content analysis to describe the extent, content, and character of these comments, and to identify which performance skills staff focus on in providing such feedback.

  • (2003) Magin, Douglas; Helmore, Phillip; Barber, Tracie J
    Conference Paper
    A number of studies have questioned the criterion validity of peer assessed oral presentations. Claims have been made that students are likely to employ a different perspective from teachers when assessing overall presentation quality, even when both are guided by a common checklist of relevant skill components.To date, no empirical investigations have been undertaken to determine how students differ from staff in the criteria they apply. this paper analyses peer and teacher assessment data from thesis presentations made by engineering students in a fourth year communications subject. The data consists of peer and teacher ratings on eight skill components listed on a checklist (used for feedback only), together with a global mark for the presentation (the summative assessment).The scores on the eight items were then subject to multiple regression analysis using the global mark as the criterion. Substantial differences were found between the two multiple regression equations. Discussion focuses on how these differences affect the validity of peer assessments, and the level of agreement between teacher and student assessment.

  • (2007) Churches, Alex; Green, Cliff; Field, Bruce; Wightley, Allan; Green, Lance; van de Loo, Paul; Burvill, Colin; Smith, Warren; Snook, Chris
    Conference Paper

  • (2007) Alshroof, Osama; Reizes, John; Timchenko, Victoria; Leonardi, Eddie
    Conference Paper
    ABSTRACT A numerical investigation has been performed as to the feasibility of using spherical indentations in a flat plate for enhancing heat transfer in the laminar regime. An attempt to validate the calculation procedure resulted in a significant difference with previously published results, in which the inlet boundary condition was stated to be the Polhausen distribution. An investigation of the disparity lead to a study of the effects of various boundary conditions on the development of laminar boundary layers on an infinitesimally thin flat plate. In two-dimensions, regions appear in which velocities are greater than the free stream velocity (overshoot), unless the Blasius distribution is used to predict the inlet velocity in both directions. Surprisingly, although regions of overshoot occur when areas upstream and downstream of the plate are included in calculating the flow near the plate, the velocity distribution within the boundary layer is well represented by the Blasius profile for most of the plate. Outside the boundary layer the velocity distribution depends on the position and the length of the plate. Calculations in three dimensions using inlet boundary conditions developed from the two-dimensional study indicate that a single dimple does not enhance heat transfer.

  • (2010) Alshroof, Osama; Forbes, Gareth Llewellyn; Randall, Robert Bond
    Conference Paper
    A recent research program has identified the possibility of using the analysis of casing wall pressures in the indirect measurement of gas turbine rotor blade vibration amplitudes. Analytical modelling of the casing wall pressures and reconstruction of rotor blade vibration amplitudes from the analysis of these simulated pressure signals have shown potential advantages over current non-contact rotor blade vibration measurement methods. However, the modelling made some fundamental assumptions about the casing wall pressure. One of the assumptions made was that the pressure at the blade tip is not significantly different from that measured across the clearance gap at the casing wall. This fluid-structure hypothesis is investigated in this paper. Unsteady computational fluid dynamic modelling of the flow conditions around the blade surface, combined with the blade structural motion, is performed numerically, and the distributions of the pressure across the rotor blade tip and casing clearance gap are investigated and reported.

  • (2010) Forbes, Gareth Llewellyn; Alshroof, Osama; Randall, Robert Bond
    Conference Paper
    A recent research program has identified the possibility of using the analysis of casing wall pressures in the direct measurement of gas turbine rotor blade vibration amplitudes. Currently the dominant method of non-contact measurement of gas turbine blade vibrations employs the use of a number of proximity probes located around the engine periphery measuring the blade tip (arrival) time (BTT). Despite the increasing ability of this method there still exist some limitations, viz: the requirement of a large number of sensors for each engine stage, sensitivity to sensor location, difficulties in dealing with multiple excitation frequencies and sensors being located in the gas path. Analytical modelling of the casing wall pressures and reconstruction of rotor blade vibration amplitudes from the analysis of these simulated pressure signals has shown significant improvement over current non-contact rotor blade vibration measurement limitations by requiring only a limited number of sensors and providing robust rotor blade vibration amplitude estimates in the presence of simulated measurement noise. However, this modelling was conducted with some fundamental assumptions about the casing wall pressures being made. One of these assumptions presumed that during blade motion the pressure profile around the rotor blades follows the blade’s motion while it oscillates around its equilibrium position. This assumption is investigated in this paper through the numerical modelling of the fully coupled two-way rotor blade motion and fluid pressure interaction.

  • (2006) McAlpine, Iain; Reidsema, Carl; Allen, Belinda
    Conference Paper

  • (2007) Cianci, Daniella; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai
    Conference Paper
    A comprehensive literature review of noise levels in the hospital intensive care unit (ICU) revealed that noise is a problem in the ICU. Numerous studies conducted in overseas hospitals consistently found that the noise levels exceeded recommended levels. Patients in the ICU are in a critical condition. Noise can prevent a person from sleeping and can be offensive. Sleep deprived patients may experience slow tissue growth and depression coupled by the strain of being in a serious state of health. A study was conducted that involved a noise level analysis of a prominent Australian hospital’s ICU. It found that the noise levels exceeded the maximum recommended design sound level prescribed by Standards Australia Investigation into the cause of the high noise levels revealed a number of sources. Recommendations were made to reduce noise levels in the ICU and design features were suggested that could reduce sound exposure to the patients.