Science

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Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • (2011) Hanaor, Dorian; Michelazzi, Marco; Chenu, Jeremy; Leonelli, Cristina; Sorrell, Charles
    Journal Article
    Thick anatase films were fabricated on graphite substrates using a method of anodic aqueous electrophoretic-deposition using oxalic acid as a dispersant. Thick films were subsequently fired in air and in nitrogen at a range of temperatures. The morphology and phase composition were assessed and the photocatalytic performance was examined by the inactivation of Escherichia coli in water. It was found that the transformation of anatase to rutile is enhanced by the presence of a graphite substrate through reduction effects. The use of a nitrogen atmosphere allows higher firing temperatures, results in less cracking of the films and yields superior bactericidal performance in comparison with firing in air. The beneficial effects of a nitrogen firing atmosphere on the photocatalytic performance of the material are likely to be a result of the diffusion of nitrogen and carbon into the TiO2 lattice and the consequent creation of new valence band states.

  • (2008) Power, M; Marlon, J; Ortiz, N; Bartlein, P; Harrison, Simon; Mayle, F; Ballouche, A; Bradshaw, R; Carcaillet, C; Cordova, C; Mooney, Scott; Moreno, P; Prentice, I; Thonicke, K; Tinner, W; Whitlock, C; Zhang, Yanling; Zhao, Yong; Ali, Amna; Anderson, Richard; Beer, R; Behling, H; Briles, C; Brown, Katherine; Brunelle, A; Bush, M; Camill, P; Chu, G; Clark, J; Colombaroli, D; Connor, Stuart; Daniau, A; Daniels, M; Dodson, John; Doughty, E; Edwards, Meredith; Finsinger, W; Foster, Douglas; Frechette, J; Gaillard, M; Gavin, D; Gobet, E; Haberle, Simon; Hallett, D; Higuera, P; Hope, G; Horn, S; Inoue, J; Kaltenrieder, P; Kennedy, Liz; Kong, Z; Larsen, C; Long, C; Lynch, Jodi; Lynch, E; McGlone, M; Meeks, S; Mensing, S; Meyer, G; Minckley, T; Mohr, J; Nelson, D; New, J; Newnham, R; Noti, R; Oswald, W; Pierce, J; Richard, P; Rowe, C; Goni, M; Shuman, B; Takahara, H; Toney, J; Turney, C; Urrego-Sanchez, D; Umbanhowar, C; Vandergoes, M; Vanniere, B; Vescovi, E
    Journal Article
    Fire activity has varied globally and continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM) in response to long-term changes in global climate and shorter-term regional changes in climate, vegetation, and human land use. We have synthesized sedimentary charcoal records of biomass burning since the LGM and present global maps showing changes in fire activity for time slices during the past 21,000 years (as differences in charcoal accumulation values compared to pre-industrial). There is strong broad-scale coherence in fire activity after the LGM, but spatial heterogeneity in the signals increases thereafter. In North America, Europe and southern South America, charcoal records indicate less-than-present fire activity during the deglacial period, from 21,000 to ∼11,000 cal yr BP. In contrast, the tropical latitudes of South America and Africa show greater-than-present fire activity from ∼19,000 to ∼17,000 cal yr BP and most sites from Indochina and Australia show greater-than-present fire activity from 16,000 to ∼13,000 cal yr BP. Many sites indicate greater-than-present or near-present activity during the Holocene with the exception of eastern North America and eastern Asia from 8,000 to ∼3,000 cal yr BP, Indonesia and Australia from 11,000 to 4,000 cal yr BP, and southern South America from 6,000 to 3,000 cal yr BP where fire activity was less than present. Regional coherence in the patterns of change in fire activity was evident throughout the post-glacial period. These complex patterns can largely be explained in terms of large-scale climate controls modulated by local changes in vegetation and fuel load.

  • (2002) Lim, May; Amal, Rose; Pinson, David; Cathers, Bruce
    Conference Paper

  • (2002) Lim, May; Lam, S; Amal, Rose; Cathers, Bruce; Pinson, David
    Conference Paper

  • (2002) Lim, May; Lam, S.W.; Amal, R.; Cathers, Bruce; Pinson, David
    Conference Paper

  • (2018) Jin, Xiaoheng
    Thesis
    Graphene oxide is a single layer of carbon atoms with decorated oxygen functional groups. Stacked monolayers in the laminate form create an interlayer space of sub-nanometer scale with oxygenated functional group to attract water molecules, and graphitic domains to allow frictionless flow of water molecules and achieve maximum efficiency of water transportation. The research reported herein is aimed to understand and explore characteristics of the diffusion-dependent mass transportation across an array of cascading nanochannels confined by graphene oxide laminates at sub-nanometer level. This dissertation has 6 Chapters. Chapter 1 is the introduction and Chapter 2 reports the recent progress in graphene oxide for mass transport application. Chapter 3 discusses efforts of engineering the channel confinement, which is represented by the interlayer spacing in between graphene oxide laminates. By adjusting the fundamental factors of graphene oxide suspension, the interlayer spacing can be controlled at 0.7 to 0.8 nm. Based on the engineered interlayer spacing, separation of vaporous mixture by graphene oxide membrane is studied in Chapter 4. Numerical description of nanochannels enclosed by graphene oxide monolayers is determined by time lag analysis. The feature of ethanol vapor transportation with the support of water vapor is revealed, showing accelerated transportation of non-permeable matter, which enriches the existing knowledge. A geometrical model of graphene oxide membrane for vapor separation was established and analyzed. In Chapter 5, adsorption and intercalated of molecules and solvated ions are studied and proved as a size-dependent enlargement of graphene oxide nanochannels. Carriers such as water and ethanol are used for transporting ions and molecules into graphene oxide slits. Taking the adsorption into consideration, permeation of vaporous substances through adsorbed graphene oxide membrane is investigated in Chapter 6. The research initiates researching crystallization of adsorbed matters in graphene oxide interlayer structure. A simplified model was directed to predict the water vapor permeation behavior of intercalated graphene oxide membrane. Such efforts not only lead to a better understating of graphene oxide membrane for gas separation but also give a hint of spatially efficient matter transport in achieving excellent electrochemical devices with graphene oxide components.