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Now showing 1 - 9 of 9
  • (2006) Hitchins, Megan; Suter, C; Wong, Jenny; Cheong, Kay; Hawkins, Nicholas; Leggett, B; Scott, R; Spigelman, Allan; Tomlinson, Ian; Martin, David; Ward, Robyn
    Journal Article

  • (2009) Gao, Steven; Lees, Justin; Wong, Jennifer; Croll, Tristan; George, Peter; Cooper-White, Justin; Tuch, Bernard
    Journal Article
    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have previously been cultured on three dimensional (3D) biodegradable polymer scaffolds. Although complex structures were formed from the hESCs, very little is known about the mechanism of adhesion of these cells to the surfaces of the scaffolds. In this study, we achieved the efficient adhesion of pluripotent hESCs to 3D poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds based on our data from a novel two dimensional (2D) model that imitates the surface properties of the scaffolds. In the 2D model, single cell preparations of pluripotent hESCs adhered efficiently and predominantly to PLGA surfaces coated with laminin in comparison to collagen I, collagen IV, or fibronectin-coated surfaces. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that almost all of the pluripotent single cells expressed the integrin 6, with a small percentage also expressing 3ß1, which facilitates adhesion to laminin. This data was then translated into the 3D environment, with the efficient binding of single pluripotent hESCs to PLGA scaffolds coated with laminin. The utility of this system was shown by the directed differentiation of single hESCs seeded within laminin-coated scaffolds toward the endoderm lineage.

  • (2004) Jackson, Katherine; Gaeta, Bruno; Sewell, William; Collins, Andrew
    Journal Article
    BACKGROUND: Immunoglobulin rearrangement involves random and imprecise processes that act to both create and constrain diversity. Two such processes are the loss of nucleotides through the action of unknown exonuclease(s) and the addition of P nucleotides. The study of such processes has been compromised by difficulties in reliably aligning immunoglobulin genes and in the partitioning of nucleotides between segment ends, and between N and P nucleotides. RESULTS: A dataset of 294 human IgM sequences was created and partitioned with the aid of a probabilistic model. Non-random removal of nucleotides is seen between the three IGH gene types with the IGHV gene averaging removals of 1.2 nucleotides compared to 4.7 for the other gene ends (p < 0.001). Individual IGHV, IGHD and IGHJ gene subgroups also display statistical differences in the level of nucleotide loss. For example, within the IGHJ group, IGHJ3 has average removals of 1.3 nucleotides compared to 6.4 nucleotides for IGHJ6 genes (p < 0.002). Analysis of putative P nucleotides within the IgM and pooled datasets revealed only a single putative P nucleotide motif (GTT at the 3` D-REGION end) to occur at a frequency significantly higher then would be expected from random N nucleotide addition. CONCLUSIONS: The loss of nucleotides due to the action of exonucleases is not random, but is influenced by the nucleotide composition of the genes. P nucleotides do not make a significant contribution to diversity of immunoglobulin sequences. Although palindromic sequences are present in 10% of immunologlobulin rearrangements, most of the `palindromic` nucleotides are likely to have been inserted into the junction during the process of N nucleotide addition. P nucleotides can only be stated with confidence to contribute to diversity of less than 1% of sequences. Any attempt to identify P nucleotides in immunoglobulins is therefore likely to introduce errors into the partitioning of such sequences. [Journal Article; In English;

  • (2006) Lee, Cathryn; Gaeta, Bruno; Malming, H; Bain, Michael; Sewell, William; Collins, Andrew
    Journal Article
    We have used a bioinformatics approach to evaluate the completeness and functionality of the reported human immunoglobulin heavy-chain IGHD gene repertoire. Using the hidden Markov-model-based iHMMune-align program, 1,080 relatively unmutated heavy-chain sequences were aligned against the reported repertoire. These alignments were compared with alignments to 1,639 more highly mutated sequences. Comparisons of the frequencies of gene utilization in the two databases, and analysis of features of aligned IGHD gene segments, including their length, the frequency with which they appear to mutate, and the frequency with which specific mutations were seen, were used to determine the reliability of alignments to the less commonly seen IGHD genes. Analysis demonstrates that IGHD4-23 and IGHD5-24, which have been reported to be open reading frames of uncertain functionality, are represented in the expressed gene repertoire; however, the functionality of IGHD6-25 must be questioned. Sequence similarities make the unequivocal identification of members of the IGHD1 gene family problematic, although all genes except IGHD1-14*01 appear to be functional. On the other hand, reported allelic variants of IGHD2-2 and of the IGHD3 gene family appear to be nonfunctional, very rare, or nonexistent. Analysis also suggests that the reported repertoire is relatively complete, although one new putative polymorphism (IGHD3-10*p03) was identified. This study therefore confirms a surprising lack of diversity in the available IGHD gene repertoire, and restriction of the germline sequence databases to the functional set described here will substantially improve the accuracy of IGHD gene alignments and therefore the accuracy of analysis of the V-D-J junction.

  • (2012) Funnell, Alister; Norton, Laura; Mak, Ka Sin; Burdach, John; Artuz, Crisbel; Twine, Natalie; Wilkins, Marc; Hung, TT; Perdomo, Jose; Power, Carl; Koh, P; Bell Anderson, Kim; Orkin, S; Fraser, Stuart; Perkins, Andrew; Pearson, Richard; Crossley, Merlin
    Journal Article
    The CACCC-box binding protein erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF/KLF1) is a master regulator that directs the expression of many important erythroid genes. We have previously shown that EKLF drives transcription of the gene for a second KLF, basic Krüppel-like factor, or KLF3. We have now tested the in vivo role of KLF3 in erythroid cells by examining Klf3 knockout mice. KLF3-deficient adults exhibit a mild compensated anemia, including enlarged spleens, increased red pulp, and a higher percentage of erythroid progenitors, together with elevated reticulocytes and abnormal erythrocytes in the peripheral blood. Impaired erythroid maturation is also observed in the fetal liver. We have found that KLF3 levels rise as erythroid cells mature to become TER119(+). Consistent with this, microarray analysis of both TER119(-) and TER119(+) erythroid populations revealed that KLF3 is most critical at the later stages of erythroid maturation and is indeed primarily a transcriptional repressor. Notably, many of the genes repressed by KLF3 are also known to be activated by EKLF. However, the majority of these are not currently recognized as erythroid-cell-specific genes. These results reveal the molecular and physiological function of KLF3, defining it as a feedback repressor that counters the activity of EKLF at selected target genes to achieve normal erythropoiesis.

  • (2008) Venturi, Vanessa; Kedzierska, K; Tanaka, Mark; Turner, Stephen; Doherty, P; Davenport, Miles
    Journal Article
    The CD8(+) T cell response is important in the control of many viral and other infections. There have been many studies aimed at better understanding the influence of T cell receptor diversity on immune responses and the evolution of the T cell receptor repertoire over time and through the various stages of immune responses to infection. In recent years, there has been an increase in both the number of studies using T cell receptor data and the volume of T cell receptor data generated per study. Appropriate analytical tools are required to analyse this data. We present a robust approach to assessing the similarity between samples of the T cell receptor repertoire, which we demonstrate on published data of subsets of the influenza A virus (DNP366)-N-b- and D(b)PA(224)- specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice sorted on the expression of CD62L, which is a marker distinguishing central and effector memory cells. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • (2005) Bull, Rowena; Hansman, Grant; Clancy, Leighton; Tanaka, Mark; Rawlinson, William; White, Peter
    Journal Article
    Norovirus (NoV) genogroups I and II (GI and GII) are now recognized as the predominant worldwide cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Three recombinant NoV GII isolates were identified and characterized, 2 of which are unrelated to any previously published recombinant NoV. Using data from the current study, published sequences, database searches, and molecular techniques, we identified 23 recombinant NoV GII and 1 recombinant NoV GI isolates. Analysis of the genetic relationships among the recombinant NoV GII isolates identified 9 independent recombinant sequences; the other 14 strains were close relatives. Two of the 9 independent recombinant NoV were closely related to other recombinants only in the polymerase region, and in a similar fashion 1 recombinant NoV was closely related to another only in the capsid region. Breakpoint analysis of recombinant NoV showed that recombination occurred in the open reading frame (ORF)1/ORF2 overlap. We provide evidence to support the theory of the role of subgenomic RNA promoters as recombination hotspots and describe a simple mechanism of how recombination might occur in NoV.

  • (2013) Kavanagh, Tomas; Mills, James D; Kim, Woojin S; Halliday, Glenda; Janitz, Michael
    Journal Article
    Pathway analysis is a powerful method for discerning differentially regulated genes and elucidating their biological importance. It allows for the identification of perturbed or aberrantly expressed genes within a biological context from extensive data sets and offers a simplistic approach for interrogating such datasets. With the growing use of microarrays and RNA-Seq data for genome wide studies is growing at an alarming rate and the use of deep sequencing is revealing elements of the genome previously uncharacterised. Through the employment of pathway analysis, mechanisms in complex diseases may be explored, and novel causatives found primarily through differentially regulated genes. Further, with the implementation of next generation sequencing (NGS) a deeper resolution may be attained, particularly in identification of isoform diversity and SNP’s. Here we look at a broad overview of pathway analysis in the human brain transcriptome and its relevance in teasing out underlying causes of complex diseases. We will outline processes in data gathering and analysis of particular diseases in which these approaches have been successful.

  • (2012) Wong, Jenny; Garner, Brett; Halliday, Glenda; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J
    Journal Article
    Selective Alzheimer’s Disease Indicator-1 (Seladin-1) was originally identified by its down-regulation in the brains of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients. Here, we re-examine existing data and present new gene expression data that refutes its role as a selective AD indicator. Furthermore, we caution against the use of the name “Seladin-1” and instead recommend adoption of the approved nomenclature, 3â-hydroxysterol Ä24-reductase (or DHCR24), which describes its catalytic function in cholesterol synthesis. Further work is required to determine what link, if any, exists between DHCR24 and AD.