Business

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 231
  • (2008) Parwada, Jerry
    Journal Article
    Fund managers` bias toward geographically proximate securities is a well-researched phenomenon, yet the origins of managers` location choices have received little empirical scrutiny. This paper traces the employment and geographic heritage of 358 entrepreneurial fund managers and analyzes the determinants of where they locate their firms and stock selections. The evidence suggests that start-ups tend to be based close to the origins of their founders and in regions with more investment management firms, banking establishments, and large institutional money managers. New money managers show a strong local bias in their equity holdings, three times the levels previously documented for mutual funds. The propensity to invest closer to home correlates strongly with the presence of sub-advisory opportunities from institutional investors in the vicinity. While home bias levels between managers who relocate with their start-ups and the rest of the entrepreneurs are similar, preferences for stocks that were formally local persist.

  • (2006) Parwada, Jerry; Faff, Robert
    Journal Article
    Published star ratings for managed funds, issued by independent agencies, are increasing in popularity, coverage in the academic literature, and influence as measured by the market share and money inflow dominance of rated funds. Hypothesising that fund ratings serve as a proxy for a fund's reputation, this article examines the managed fund inflow effect of the awarding of an initial rating by ASSIRT, Australia's largest fund rating agency. Retail equity funds record significant unexpected size changes at the announcement of the initial rating and over a one-year post-rating analysis period. Wholesale fund sizes take over six months to show the inflow effects of a ratings initiation. Cash and fixed interest funds exhibit volatile size changes whose pattern does not bear a significant relationship to the initial rating phenomenon. Finally, fund management expense ratios remain stable after the rating.

  • (2007) Gallagher, David; Parwada, Jerry; DISHI, E
    Journal Article
    This study examines how the termination of superannuation investment mandates contributes to the departure of top fund managers in companies delegated the portfolio management role. Terminations of superannuation plan mandates increase the probability of a fund company changing the responsible fund manager. Objective-adjusted returns are also significant managerial turnover considerations. These results illustrate that significant losses of superannuation fund clients act as an external control mechanism in the investment management industry that complements internal managerial performance measures.

  • (2003) Parwada, Jerry
    Journal Article
    This study examines how the termination of superannuation investment mandates contributes to the departure of top fund managers in companies delegated the portfolio management role. Terminations of superannuation plan mandates increase the probability of a fund company changing the responsible fund manager. Objective-adjusted returns are also significant managerial turnover considerations. These results illustrate that significant losses of superannuation fund clients act as an external control mechanism in the investment management industry that complements internal managerial performance measures.

  • (2004) Parwada, Jerry; Allen, David
    Journal Article
    This study investigates the alleged disintermediation of banks’ traditional deposit-taking in favour of investment management activities. Using data on Australian bank-affiliated funds and a nine-year record of the parent banks’ liability balances, this study finds that managed funds do not displace bank liabilities. Prudential capital adequacy requirements dissuade banks from using in-house managed investments as indirect conduits for raising funds in the same manner as deposit-taking.

  • (2005) Parwada, Jerry; Faff, Robert
    Journal Article
    We examine the impact of several factors on the selection of portfolio managers for Australian pension plan mandates. Performance measures do not affect the probability of a mandate allocation. Pension sponsors tend to choose managers with top-quartile five-year performance who have recently beaten a market benchmark. Management expenses have a negative impact on a manager’s chances. A surprising result is sponsors’ tolerance for high portfolio trading costs. Mandates are spread across manager investment styles. The style and institutional attributes of preferred managers suggest trustees’ reputation and prudential concerns matter, particularly for the aggregate annual mandate allocations.

  • (2006) Allen, David; Parwada, Jerry
    Journal Article
    Purpose – This paper aims to examine mutual fund investors' response to mergers of Australian mutual fund companies. Design/methodology/approach – Two matching-control techniques are employed to analyse the impact of mergers on excess money in and out of open and closed funds involved in the transactions. The paper employs cross-sectional regression analyses to examine the impact of mergers on different types of parties to mergers. Findings – The results suggest that mergers are not accompanied by increased money flows. Instead investors withdraw from the target funds prior to and after the merger. Funds belonging to specialist mutual fund companies record more gains in assets under management than declines following mergers, and that money inflow gains at competing funds induce reductions of management expense ratios at target funds. Research limitations/implications – This paper studies mergers in only one industry in a single country. Future studies may extend to other industries and economies. Originality/value – This paper extends prior research on the flow effects of mergers at individual fund level by considering the issue at the corporate level.

  • (2007) Parwada, Jerry; Oh, Natalie
    Journal Article
    This paper analyses relations between stock market returns and mutual fund flows in Korea. A positive relationship exists between stock market returns and mutual fund flows, measured as stock purchases and sales and net trading volumes. In aggregate, mutual funds are negative feedback traders. Standard causality tests suggest that it is predominantly returns that drive flows, while stock sales may contain information about returns. After controlling for declining markets, the results suggest Korean equity fund managers tend to increase stock purchases in times of rising market volatility, possibly disregarding fundamental information, and to sell in times of wide dispersion in investor beliefs.

  • (2007) Faff, Robert; Parwada, Jerry; Poh, Hun-Lune
    Journal Article
    We examine the information content of managed fund ratings for Australian retail investors. Because fund ratings, premised on a quantitative-qualitative model, are highly transitory, we question whether investors formulate their investment decisions with respect to changes in ratings and whether ratings, in turn, react to fund flows. We find that information regarding fund flows can be obtained from ratings, and that rating changes can have farreaching effects. Investors flock to newly upgraded funds while they penalize those that have been downgraded by withdrawing funds. Investors are constantly anticipating ratings revisions, particularly downgrades, and we attribute this phenomenon to the role of qualitative factors in the ratings.