Medicine & Health

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • (2002) Meiser, Bettina; Butow, P.; Friedlander, Michael; Barratt, Anthony; Schnieden, Vivienne; Watson, M; Brown, J; Tucker, K
    Journal Article
    Psychological adjustment in 90 women (30 carriers and 60 non-carriers) who had undergone genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes was compared with that of 53 women who were not offered genetic testing. Women were assessed prior to genetic testing and 7–10 days, 4 and 12 months after carrier status disclosure using self-administered questionnaires. Compared with women not offered testing, mutation carriers had significantly higher breast cancer distress 7–10 days (t=2.80, P=0.005) and 12 months (t=2.01, P=0.045) post-notification. Non-carriers showed a significant decrease in state anxiety 7–10 days post-notification (t=2.27, P=0.024) and in depression 4 months post-notification (t=2.26, P=0.024), compared with women not offered testing. These data show that non-carriers derive psychological benefits from genetic testing. Women testing positive may anticipate a sustained increase in breast cancer distress following disclosure, although no other adverse psychological outcomes were observed in this group.

  • (2008) Davidson, Robert; Spooner, Catherine; Fisher, Karen; Newton, BJ; Dadich, Ann; Smyth, Ciara; Tudball, Jacqueline; Flaxman, Saul
    Report

  • (2008) Fisher, Karen; Tudball, Jacqueline; Redmond, Gerard
    Report

  • (2008) McDermott, Shannon; Spooner, Catherine
    Report

  • (2002) Fisher, Karen; Kemp, Lynn; Tudball, Jacqueline
    Report
    This document is the Final Draft of the Families First Outcomes Evaluation Framework, concerned with evaluating child, family and community outcomes. It is one of the evaluation activities for Families First. Others include process evaluation through Area Reviews of three Families First Areas in 2002-03, local Area evaluations and program evaluation of the projects funded through Families First. This outcome evaluation activity will inform the other evaluation activities. Overall the evaluation considers whether Families First has been effective in supporting families and communities in NSW to care for children using an early intervention approach and in developing linkages between specialised health, education, community and other policies. The Framework includes suggestions for minimum data collection and foundations for extending studies beyond the budget of the evaluation. A general aim in choosing the outcome indicators is to maintain compatibility with simultaneous program evaluation of similar NSW, Commonwealth and international programs.

  • (2005) Brodaty, Henry; Thomson, Cathy; Thompson, Claire; Fine, Michael
    Journal Article
    OBJECTIVES: To develop a typography of the characteristics of caregivers of community dwelling people with dementia or memory loss who do not use services and empirically investigate the reasons for service non-use. METHOD: The findings of a literature review were used to develop a typography of caregivers' non-use of services. This typography was applied to a sample of community-based caregivers. RESULTS: One in three caregivers were using no services and one in four only one service. Despite considerable proportions reporting low levels of life satisfaction and high levels of overload and resentment the main reasons caregivers gave for not using services were that they did not consider they needed the services. Other reasons for service non-use included care recipient reluctance to use services, lack of knowledge of services or being in the process of applying for services. Service availability or affordability were not identified as major impediments to service use. Presence of a physical disability and contact with a social worker were associated with service use. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers of people with dementia incur significant strain and have substantial need for a variety of services. Nevertheless many caregivers were not using support services, mainly because of perceived lack of need or lack of awareness. Better public promotion of services, destigmatising dementia and encouraging referrals from health professionals could help overcome the barriers to service use.