Medicine & Health

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 230
  • (2008) Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Ng, Judy; Chan, Raymond; Bunker, Jeremy; Zwar, N
    Journal Article
    Objective: In 2002, New South Wales (NSW) Health introduced an updated policy for occupational screening and vaccination against infectious diseases. This study describes healthcare worker (HCW) immunity to hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and varicella based on serological screening, following introduction of this policy. Methods: HCW screening serology performed at two healthcare facilities in south western Sydney (Bankstown and Fairfield) was extracted for the period September 2003 to September 2005. Immunity to hepatitis B, MMR and varicella was quantitated and cross-tabulated against age, sex and staff risk category. Results: A total of 1,320 HCWs were screened. Almost two thirds were immune to hepatitis B while immunity to MMR and varicella ranged from 88% to 94%. Age stratification showed lower levels of measles immunity in those born after 1965. Conclusions: Despite availability of vaccination for over two decades, a significant proportion of HCWs at these two facilities were non-immune to hepatitis B. This is of concern for those non-immune staff involved in direct clinical care, who are at risk of blood and body fluid exposures. The small group of HCWs non-immune to MMR and varicella pose a risk to themselves and others in the event of an outbreak. Implications: There is a need for improved implementation of the occupational screening and vaccination policy, including better education of HCWs about the risks of non-immunity to vaccine preventable diseases. The revised 2007 NSW Health policy may assist this process and will need evaluation to determine whether HCW immunity improves in the coming years.

  • (1998) Wool, R; Kusefoglu, S; Khot, S; Zhao, R; Palmese, Gaetano; Boyd, Andrew; Fisher, Keith; Bandyopadhyay, Srikanta; Williams, J; Wang, Chaoyuan
    Conference Paper

  • (2002) Meiser, Bettina; Butow, P.; Friedlander, Michael; Barratt, Anthony; Schnieden, Vivienne; Watson, M; Brown, J; Tucker, K
    Journal Article
    Psychological adjustment in 90 women (30 carriers and 60 non-carriers) who had undergone genetic testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes was compared with that of 53 women who were not offered genetic testing. Women were assessed prior to genetic testing and 7–10 days, 4 and 12 months after carrier status disclosure using self-administered questionnaires. Compared with women not offered testing, mutation carriers had significantly higher breast cancer distress 7–10 days (t=2.80, P=0.005) and 12 months (t=2.01, P=0.045) post-notification. Non-carriers showed a significant decrease in state anxiety 7–10 days post-notification (t=2.27, P=0.024) and in depression 4 months post-notification (t=2.26, P=0.024), compared with women not offered testing. These data show that non-carriers derive psychological benefits from genetic testing. Women testing positive may anticipate a sustained increase in breast cancer distress following disclosure, although no other adverse psychological outcomes were observed in this group.

  • (2004) Muir, Alison; Meiser, Bettina; Tucker, Monica; Andrews, Leslie; Tucker, Katherine; Friedlander, Michael
    Journal Article
    There is significant interest in developing chemoprevention trials for women at high risk for breast cancer, yet it is not clear how acceptable these strategies are. Results of clinical trials with tamoxifen have demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of breast cancer in women at increased risk, but rates of participation in such trials have been lower than expected. No previous Studies have assessed the attitudes of high-risk women toward participating in chemoprevention trials using drugs causing ovarian Suppression. All women who had attended a large familial cancer clinic in Sydney, New South Wales, between 1994 and 2000 who were eligible for the Raloxifene and Zoladex Research Study being piloted in the United Kingdom at the time were approached. Telephone interviews were conducted with the 35 high-risk women willing to participate in this study. Almost half the women Surveyed expressed willingness to participate in a randomized trial, and slightly fewer women considered participating in a nonrandomized trial. The women who Would consider participating were younger than those who would not. The most frequently mentioned reasons for interest In participating in trials were to aid research, help others, and learn more, which indicates that altruism may have played a significant part in the women`s willingness to participate. Most women interviewed were participating in risk reduction and early detection strategies and expressed high interest in research screening tests. Given the interest in randomized trials and the fact that women at high risk for breast cancer consider the side effects as mainly acceptable, undertaking Such trials may be worthwhile.

  • (1998) Van de Ven, Paul; Prestage, Garrett; Kippax, Susan; French, Judy; Gregory, Horn; Brotherton, Alan
    Report
    The Melbourne Gay Community Periodic Survey is a cross-sectional survey of gay and homosexually active men recruited through a range of sites in the Melbourne metropolitan area. The project was funded by the Victorian Department of Human Services. The Periodic Survey provides a snapshot of sexual and HIV-related practices among gay and homosexually active men.

  • (1999) Van de Ven, Paul; Prestage, Garrett; Kippax, Susan; French, Judy; Bonello, John; Kay, Peter
    Report
    Gay Community Periodic Surveys surveys are regularly conducted in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth to monitor changes in sexual and other risk practices over time among Australian gay men who are gay community attached, recruited from gay sex-on-premises venues, social sites and clinics.

  • (1998) Van de Ven, Paul; Prestage, Garrett; Kippax, Susan; Benzie, Tim; Clementson, Chris
    Report
    Gay Community Periodic Surveys surveys are regularly conducted in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth to monitor changes in sexual and other risk practices over time among Australian gay men who are gay community attached, recruited from gay sex-on-premises venues, social sites and clinics.

  • (2008) Zablotska, Iryna; Prestage, Garrett; Frankland, Andrew; Chong, Stanley; Sutherland, Rob; Corrigan, Nick; Honnor, Geoff; Kippax, Susan
    Report
    Gay Community Periodic Surveys surveys are regularly conducted in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Cairns, Canberra, Adelaide and Perth to monitor changes in sexual and other risk practices over time among Australian gay men who are gay community attached, recruited from gay sex-on-premises venues, social sites and clinics.

  • (2002) Mao, Limin; Van de Ven, Paul; Prestage, Garrett; Jin, Fengyi; Grulich, Andrew; Crawford, June; Kippax, Susan; Murphy, Dean; Allan, Brent
    Report
    The Health in Men (HIM) cohort is a longitudinal (5-year) study of HIV-negative gay men in Sydney which started in June 2001. It has two arms: a socio-behavioural arm consisting of regular interviews about the impact of HIV on the sexual and social lives of men in the study; and a clinical arm consisting of serological testing for HIV and other sexually transmissible infections. The data collected allow socio-behavioural data to be directly compared with clinical data. Participants are interviewed annually and tested for HIV and other STIs. Up to 500 new men are recruited to the study each year.

  • (2003) Fogarty, Andrea; Rawstorne, Patrick; Prestage, Garrett; Grierson, Jeffrey; Grulich, Andrew; Kippax, Susan; Worth, Heather; Murphy, Dean
    Report
    Positive Health is a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-positive men and women living in NSW and Victoria. A major focus is the impact of HIV and associated treatments on health, and more generally, on the lived experience of People Living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) over time.