Medicine & Health

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 23
  • (2008) Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Ng, Judy; Chan, Raymond; Bunker, Jeremy; Zwar, N
    Journal Article
    Objective: In 2002, New South Wales (NSW) Health introduced an updated policy for occupational screening and vaccination against infectious diseases. This study describes healthcare worker (HCW) immunity to hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and varicella based on serological screening, following introduction of this policy. Methods: HCW screening serology performed at two healthcare facilities in south western Sydney (Bankstown and Fairfield) was extracted for the period September 2003 to September 2005. Immunity to hepatitis B, MMR and varicella was quantitated and cross-tabulated against age, sex and staff risk category. Results: A total of 1,320 HCWs were screened. Almost two thirds were immune to hepatitis B while immunity to MMR and varicella ranged from 88% to 94%. Age stratification showed lower levels of measles immunity in those born after 1965. Conclusions: Despite availability of vaccination for over two decades, a significant proportion of HCWs at these two facilities were non-immune to hepatitis B. This is of concern for those non-immune staff involved in direct clinical care, who are at risk of blood and body fluid exposures. The small group of HCWs non-immune to MMR and varicella pose a risk to themselves and others in the event of an outbreak. Implications: There is a need for improved implementation of the occupational screening and vaccination policy, including better education of HCWs about the risks of non-immunity to vaccine preventable diseases. The revised 2007 NSW Health policy may assist this process and will need evaluation to determine whether HCW immunity improves in the coming years.

  • (2011) Bryant, Joanne; Ward, James; Worth, Heather; Hull, Peter; Solar , Sarina; Bailey , Sandra
    Journal Article

  • (2006) Mackenzie, C; Zion, D.; Silove, Derrick; Tarantola, Daniel; Pittaway, Eileen; Zwi, Anthony; Grove, Natalie
    Journal Article

  • (2010) Kelly, Angela; Worth, Heather; Man, N.; Nosi, S.; Emori, R.; Mek, A.; Akuani, F.; Kupul, M.; Kepa, B.; Walizopa, L.; Pirpir, L.; Cangah , B.; Siba , P.; Frankland, Andrew; Rawstorne, Patrick
    Journal Article
    Papua New Guinea (PNG) is in a phase of scaling up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and adherence to the newly available drug therapy is becoming an important issue. This paper examines adherence to ART in a sample of 374 HIV-positive people in six provinces in PNG. Participants were recruited to the study using non-probability sampling. Sixty-two % of participants reported complete adherence (no missed or late doses in the past week) and 79% reported not missing any doses in the last week. Revival church members were significantly more likely to report having missing a treatment dose(s) (66%). Those living in the Highlands and those attending Catholic health clinics were significantly more likely to be adherent to their treatment. Age, gender, marital status, education level and employment type did not show significant association with treatment adherence. Adherence rates in PNG are not alarming, indicating that people with HIV can adhere to treatment despite the challenges of living in PNG.

  • (2011) Holt, Martin; Rawstorne, Patrick; Worth, Heather; Bittman, Michael; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Kippax, Susan
    Journal Article
    We analysed HIV disclosure between Australian men who have sex with men (MSM) who reported anal intercourse with their last casual male partner. Of 804 MSM included in the analysis, 413 reported HIV disclosure and 391 reported no disclosure. After identifying bivariate associations with HIV disclosure, we developed three models of HIV disclosure (one for untested, one for HIV-negative and one for HIV-positive MSM). A range of factors was found to be associated with HIV disclosure. Having previously had sex with the last casual male partner and expecting HIV-negative and HIV-positive men to disclose before sex were predictors of HIV disclosure shared by more than one serostatus group. As unprotected anal intercourse was more common among MSM who disclosed (across all serostatus groups), we suggest caution should be exercised before encouraging HIV disclosure as a prevention strategy. Nondisclosure remains more strongly associated with safe sex among Australian MSM.

  • (2003) Reid, A.; Worth, Heather; McMillan, Karen
    Journal Article

  • (2005) Worth, Heather; McMillan, Karen; Simmons, Laurence; Molloy, Maureen; Worth, Heather
    Book Chapter

  • (2003) McMillan, Karen; Worth, Heather
    Book Chapter

  • (2010) Prestage, Garrett; Imrie, John; Kippax, Susan; Donovan, Basil; Templeton, David; Cunningham, Amy; Mindel, Adrian; Cunningham, Philip; Kaldor, John; Grulich, Andrew; Jin, Feng Yi
    Journal Article

  • (2010) Holt, Martin; Rawstorne, Patrick; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Worth, Heather
    Journal Article
    A significant minority of Australian men who have sex with men (MSM) have never been tested for HIV and many men do not test as often as recommended. Using data from 1770 HIV-negative and untested MSM collected in a national, online survey, we compared men who had never tested for HIV with those who had tested over 12 months ago and men who had tested over 12 months ago with those that had tested in the past year. Two multivariate logistic regression models were constructed. Compared with men tested over 12 months ago, untested men were younger, less educated, less likely to have unprotected anal intercourse with a regular male partner, less likely to have sought advice from a doctor, nurse or community organisation, more likely to expect HIV-negative disclosure, had fewer gay friends and spent more time using social networking websites. Compared with men who had tested over 12 months ago, men who had tested within the last year were younger, more likely to expect HIV-negative disclosure and disclose to casual partners, more likely to have sought advice from a doctor or nurse, had attended gay pools, gyms or beaches and had more gay friends and more male sex partners. Our findings suggest that the Internet and sex education in schools are important ways to promote HIV testing to untested MSM. Testing reinforcement messages delivered through gay community outreach and primary care will reach previously tested MSM.