Medicine & Health

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 234
  • (2007) Mireskandari, Shab; Sherman, K; Meiser, Bettina; Taylor, Alan; Gleeson, Margaret; Andrews, L; Tucker, Katherine
    Journal Article
    Purpose: The aim of the current research was to characterize psychological adjustment among partners of women at high risk of developing breast/ovarian cancer and to explore the relationship between women`s and partners` adjustment. Methods: A study of 95 unaffected at-risk women and 95 partners was carried out using mailed, self-administered questionnaires with validated measures of psychological outcome. Results: Elevated levels of distress were noted in up to 10% of partners. High monitoring coping style and greater perceived breast cancer risk for their wife were associated with higher distress levels for partners. However, communicating openly with their wife and the occurrence of a recent cancer-related event in the woman`s family were related to lower distress for partners. Partners` cancer-specific distress was positively related to their wives` distress. Conclusion: Among partners with elevated levels of distress, the ability to provide effective support to the at-risk women and participate appropriately in their decision making may be compromised. These partners are likely to benefit from targeted clinical interventions designed to reduce their distress levels. The findings emphasize the importance of considering partners of at-risk women in service provision and highlight the need for partners to obtain information and support specifically tailored to their needs.

  • (2005) Yeo, Soo; Meiser, Bettina; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Goldstein, David; Tucker, Katherine; Eisenbruch, Maurice
    Journal Article
    Ethnography was employed to investigate the hypothesis that the cultural meaning of cancer is one of the possible barriers to access of cancer services. The objectives were to identify indigenous terminologies, taxonomies and illness explanatory models of cancer in a community-based sample of 15 Chinese-Australians and a sample of 16 informants who had been recruited through two Sydney familial cancer clinics. Many of the informants included in their narrative terms that seemed to match Western biomedical explanations for cancer. The majority of informants also maintained traditional Chinese beliefs, despite high acculturation and beliefs in biomedical explanations about cancer. Explanations of illness including cancer, referred to the following concepts: (i) karma (yeh), (ii) retribution (bao ying), (iii) fate (ming yun) or Heaven's or God's will, (iv) geomancy (feng-shui), (v) touched evil (zhong chia), (vi) misfortune or bad luck (shui wan, dong hark); (vii) offending the gods or deities requiring prayers or offerings for appeasement; and (viii) kong-tau (spells invoked through human intervention). Taking into consideration the heterogeneity of the Chinese population, the findings provide an insight into Chinese illness conceptualization that may assist health professionals to develop an understanding of how the cultural explanatory models affect access to screening services, communication of diagnosis of cancer and management of treatment regimen.

  • (2005) Meiser, Bettina; Dunn, Stewart; Dixon, Jeannette; Powell, Lawrie W.
    Journal Article
    This study assessed psychological adjustment and quality of life relative to population-based norms and knowledge about hereditary hemochromatosis in a sample of 101 patients who attended a hemochromatosis clinic. Participants were assessed prior to their clinic visit, and two weeks and 12 months after attendance, using self-administered questionnaires. Mean Mental Health Component Scores from the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) (45.3, 95% CI 43.2, 47.4) were as compromised as those found amongst stroke victims (45.9, 95% CI 42.8, 49.0) who had participated in a national health survey. Recall of the genetic testing result was less than optimal, in that only 69.3% of those with genetic testing results knew whether they carried one or two mutations. This study demonstrates that patients would benefit from routine assessment of psychological distress and referral to mental health professionals of those whose levels of distress suggest a need for clinical intervention. Results also show that patients may benefit from strategies aimed at improving recall of genetic testing results.

  • (2004) Meiser, Bettina; Collins, V; Warren, R; Gaff, C; St John, D; Young, M; Harrop, K; Brown, Julieanne; Halliday, J
    Journal Article
    The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = -3.98; p < 0.001) and 4 months post-notification of result (t = -3.22; p = 0.002). For non-carriers, significant decreases in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer were observed at all follow-up assessment time points relative to baseline. Non-carriers also showed significant decreases from baseline in mean depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = -3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers.

  • (2012) Zhang, Alex; Govender, Sendhil; Colebatch, James
    Journal Article
    Recent studies have demonstrated the frequency selectivity of air-conducted (AC) and bone-conducted (BC) stimuli in eliciting ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs). In this study frequency tuning of the oVEMP was assessed in patients with superior canal dehiscence (SCD) and compared to responses previously reported for healthy subjects. Six (five unilateral) SCD patients were stimulated using AC sound (50 – 1200 Hz) and BC transmastoid vibration (50 – 1000 Hz). Stimuli were delivered at two standardized intensities: one the same as previously used for healthy controls and the other at 10 dB above vestibular threshold (a similar relative intensity to that used in controls). For AC stimulation, SCD patients had larger oVEMP amplitudes across all frequencies tested for both stimulus intensities. Normalized tuning curves demonstrated greater high frequency responses with the stronger stimulus. For BC stimulation, larger oVEMP amplitudes were produced at frequencies at and above 100 Hz using standard intensity stimuli. For the matched intensity above vestibular threshold, enhancement of the oVEMP response was present in SCD patients for 500 – 800 Hz only. We conclude that SCD causes greater facilitation for AC than BC stimuli. The high frequency response is likely to originate from the superior (anterior) canal and is consistent with models of inner ear changes occurring in SCD.

  • (2012) Govender, Sendhil; Colebatch, James
    Journal Article
    No abstract.

  • (2012) Colebatch, James
    Journal Article
    Nil

  • (2012) Colebatch, James
    Journal Article
    Effects of different electrode placements and indifferent electrodes were investigated for the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). In 5 normal volunteers, the motor point of the left SCM was identified and an electrode placed there. A grid of 7 additional electrodes was laid out, along and across the SCM, based upon the location of the motor point. One reference electrode was placed over the sternoclavicular joint and another over C7. There were clear morphological changes with differing recording sites and for the two reference electrodes, but the earliest and largest responses were recorded from the motor point. The C7 reference affected the level of rectified EMG and was associated with an initial negativity in some electrodes. The latencies of the p13 potentials increased with distance from the motor point but the n23 latencies did not. Thus the p13 potential behaved as a travelling wave whereas the n23 behaved as a standing wave. The C7 reference may be contaminated by other evoked myogenic activity. Ideally recordings should be made with an active electrode over the motor point.

  • (2006) Zwar, N; Harris, Mark; Griffiths, R; Roland, Martin; Dennis, Sarah; Powell Davies, G; Hasan, I
    Report
    This is the final report of a systematic review conducted as part of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) Stream Four funding. The aim of Stream Four was to systematically identify, review, and synthesise knowledge about primary health care organisation, funding, delivery and performance and then consider how this knowledge might be applied in the Australian context. This particular review focussed on the management of chronic diseases in the primary care setting.

  • (2007) Zwar, N; Dennis, Sarah; Griffiths, R; Perkins, D; May, J; Sibbald, B; Caplan, G; Harris, Mark
    Report