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  • (2002) Peng, Gang-Ding; Chu, Pak
    Conference Paper

  • (2011) Fletcher, Janet
    Conference Paper
    When entering an academic library, customers most often see a service desk. Some libraries have one desk and other libraries have multiple service points. At the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Library there is none. The rationale behind a no desk academic library is: to create a more user friendly environment where library staff approach and greet customers rather than the other way around exploit self-service technologies by providing self-service check outs, computer terminals and shopping centre-style kiosks ensure that the Library s prime real estate is used even when library staff are not present .After extensive renovations the Library has become an exemplar for customer space, providing flexible facilities and services that positively respond to the needs of today s (and future) customers. The Help Zone is designed to be a place where customers seek assistance with staff taking a customer to a workstation/self-check machine/kiosk to undertake an activity. At the Help Zone customers are encouraged to find out answers for themselves with staff members acting as guides rather than the experts. This paper outlines the design features and service model of UNSW Library s Help Zone. It provides details on changes to staffing work and structure, responses from customers, designing the shopping centre-style kiosks, and the intended rollout plan to other (non library) service areas of the University.

  • (2011) Bailin, Kylie; Croucher, Joanne L.
    Conference Paper
    In this BoF [Birds of a Feather Discussion Session] we seek engagement with researchers and eResearch professionals to explore different approaches to having conversations about research data access and reuse. Rather than typifying open data as an all-or-nothing dichotomy, the discussion will be framed around the idea of a continuum of openness. Key areas to be explored include research communities expectations of reciprocity, and the changing expectations of funding agencies and publishers. Another topic for discussion is the current and future roles for libraries, data librarians and eResearch intermediaries in research data management. One of the biggest hurdles in beginning the eResearch discussion with researchers is explaining about this spectrum of open data and quelling fears that all data will have to be completely open. This discussion will look at the complexities involved with supporting researchers and informing them about all the different levels of openness. This BoF will also look at education and training as it relates to open data and building capabilities among both support professionals and researchers.

  • (2004) Frances, Maude; Wilson, Concepción S
    Conference Paper
    This presentation is based on interview data from a quantitative and qualitative research project exploring the use of print- and internet-based information sources by people with hepatitis C. Traditional modes of information provision within clinical encounters have been altered by public internet access to resources and information that were previously accessed almost exclusively by health professionals. A national online survey was conducted to discover how people with hepatitis C used the internet to seek information relating to their illness and how they then made use of this information. Those who responded to the survey were asked to volunteer for a follow-up, face-to-face, semi-structured interview. Twenty people, from the Australian states of New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia, were interviewed. Findings indicate that there is a need for greater understanding among medical and information professionals of lay capacities to collect, understand and act upon information from the internet. Unlike people who use the internet for occasional health information, many people with chronic illness develop, over time, complex strategies for accessing, evaluating and applying online information.

  • (2004) Bennett, Rick; McIntyre, Simon
    Conference Paper
    The last decade witnessed a ‘virtual goldrush’ of activity in regard to online education worldwide. Unfortunately, many institutions and software companies flattened the pedagogical landscape in a scramble to establish their own online presence. In general, what remained were hastily planned and generally low quality subjects/programs: sadly reinforcing belief that online education is a poor substitute for face-to-face learning and teaching. Fortunately, time has moved on, with more credible institutions realising that quality must be the key component of online education. Some have begun to identify highlights of previous examples and are building upon them. It has become apparent that to achieve purposeful and quality online subjects, educators need to look past an immediate return and view a more long-term solution. COFA Online was established at the College of Fine Arts in 2003, and has since been planning, developing and teaching online subjects in art and design practice, education and theory - methodically building the foundations of a sustainable online program. This paper outlines the COFA Online Course Author Fellowship program and how it aims to provide a quality experience for students studying online