Creative Work (non-textual)

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  • (2008) Murray, Ainslie
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    An Architecture of Thread and Gesture is a series of three spatial works considering the impact of human gesture on architectural space. The work is drawn from an encounter with Kyoto artist Machiko Agano in 2006. As Agano installed a three-dimensional textile work in a gallery space, the fluid movement of her hands was mapped to generate a series of spatial diagrams. The diagrams reflected a complex series of invisible spatial interactions and offered insight into an alternative way of considering architecture. In An Architecture of Thread and Gesture, these diagrams have been revisited and reinterpreted in three dimensions to offer a new kind of ‘construction’. Threads of monofilament trace the choreography of the human body moving through space in varying intensities, gradually shifting attention from material traces to the passage of light through surface perforations. Gesture, handwork and materiality are pursued to an extreme before finally dissolving in showers of light.

  • (2011) Murray, Ainslie
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    Utterances considers the role of the body in generating architectural space by actively incorporating the shadows cast by a wandering audience into the work. The currency of physical entities is called into question as shadows of the body appear to move amongst the panels even as the body itself remains distant. The creative tension between the tangible and the intangible becomes evident in the space between the perforated works and their shadows; an ambiguous architectural space emerges akin to the utterance of a word before it is wholly formed.

  • (2011) Murray, Ainslie
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    Dissolution and Departure is a spatial meditation on the weight of architecture. A minimal space for the body to navigate is formed with lightweight materials; air and light penetrate the space and begin to dissolve it. A fragmented language of movement and gesture is embodied in the dissolving spatial surfaces, ritualistically writing and rewriting the presence of the body in space. The body inhabits an immersive, liquid space; an architecture is created that might float away in air.

  • (2007) Murray, Ainslie
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    Interference is a series of large-scale textile works exploring the impact of the moving body on air in architectural space. A single hand is isolated in the act of unfurling, its upward and downward arcs traced in two dimensions. Air is considered as liquid, and the wake of the hand is traced in a series of radiating lines marking both time and space. Architecture offers itself as a containing edge, continuously reflecting the displaced air within itself. Over time the bounded space develops an invisible turbulence; a complexity that belies its apparent stillness. This work reflects upon different modes of space-making and is developed from an encounter with textile artist Machiko Agano in Kyoto in 2006. Air is considered as the primary substance of architectural space, and its invisible disturbances and trajectories are made visible as alternative forms of structure. This work is an architecture of body, air and motion; it is an architecture drawn from the barely perceived consequences of our movements within air.

  • (2007) Murray, Ainslie
    Creative Work (non-textual)
    Footfall considered the tensions between the geometric conceptualisation of a walk as articulated on a map, and the actual experience of it in terms of the physical change in altitude. Each maquette was made of folded and stitched Mylar and related to walks made to Burstall Pass, the Burgess Shale and Sulphur Mountain, near Banff, Canada. The Mylar surface was repetitiously perforated with a map of each walk and placed directly opposite a constructed section of each walk. Corresponding sites on the plan and section were then connected through monofilament stitching to construct a three-dimensional web within the space of the maquette. This manner of relating modes of architectural drawing allowed the crossing of body and space as articulated on a map to take on a non-representational three-dimensional form. In these works the act of stitching recalled the repetitious act of walking, and the monofilament web emerged as a shadow of both the walk and the act of stitching required to construct it.